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Find Text Leading from Acrobat PDF

Ever have to recreate a document from an Acrobat PDF? You can find out most everything about the text by using the Object Inspector, except the leading. Well, here's a cheesy way to figure it out. Open the PDF in Illustrator (you just need one page). Release any and all clipping masks. Draw a guide at the baseline of the first line of text, and one on the line below. Now, Option-drag the first line to make a copy, and position it exactly next to the original first line at baseline. Then put a return anywhere in the copied line. Now adjust leading of the copied lines, so that the second line of copy rests on the baseline of the second line of the original. Now you know your leading.

Or you could buy expensive software to find the leading. Your choice.

Visit Mac Production Artist Tips and Scripts

Submitted by
Greg Ledger

 

 

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Apple Settles with Creative for $100 Million

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Removing a dark cloud from the future of its now-iconic iPod music players, Apple Computer has announced it will pay Creative Technologies $100 million to settle all legal disputes between the companies. The payment grants Apple a paid-up license to use Creative's so-called "Zen" patent in all Apple products; under the terms of the agreement, Apple can recoup some of the money if Creative is able to license the Zen patent to other parties.

Creative filed suit against Apple in May 2006, almost 10 months after having been granted a patent on the organization and navigation of music tracks on a portable device. Creative initially filed for the patent in January 2001, when it debuted its first Nomad and Zen music players. Apple introduced the first iPod in October 2001. However, Creative's claim took until August 2005 to wend its way through the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

The settlement not only removes doubts from the future of the iPod line (as part of its suit, Creative was seeking to block the importation of iPods into the United States), but also saves Creative from a protracted and costly patent battle. In addition to having to prove its case against Apple, Apple had filed two salvos of suits accusing Creative of violating Apple patents. The settlement presumably lets the companies set aside all litigation, and - what's more - Apple gains a partner. Creative plans to join Apple's "Made for iPod" program and begin producing its own lines of iPod accessories later this year.

 

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