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Viewing Wi-Fi Details in Snow Leopard

In Snow Leopard, hold down the Option key before clicking the AirPort menu. Doing so reveals additional technical details including which standards, speeds, and frequencies you're using to connect, as well as what's in use by other networks. With the Option key held down and with a network already joined, the AirPort menu reveals seven pieces of information: the PHY Mode, the MAC (Media Access Control) address, the channel and band in use, the security method that's in use, the RSSI (Received Signal Strength Indication) measurement, the transmit rate, and the MCS Index. In Leopard, some, but not all, of these details are revealed by Option-clicking the AirPort menu.

Submitted by
Doug McLean

 

 

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Apple Admits Some iPods Shipped with Windows Virus

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Apple announced that "a small number" of the video-capable iPods shipped since new iPod models were introduced last month (see "Apple Updates iPods, Introduces Movies, Previews iTV," 18-Sep-06) are infected with the Windows-based RavMonE.exe virus. While this known virus can't affect the iPod itself, or Mac OS computers, it can affect Windows computers to which the iPod is connected, potentially including copies of Windows running on Macs via Boot Camp or Parallels Desktop.

Properly updated anti-virus software running on a Windows computer should detect and remove the virus; Apple's Web page about the infected iPods offers links to free tools to scan for and/or remove the virus. Fewer than 1 percent of fifth-generation video iPods available during the last five weeks are affected; no iPod nano or iPod shuffle models were involved.

Apple urges Windows users to scan their iPods with current anti-virus software, and then if the virus is found and removed, to use iTunes 7 to restore the original software. Apple couldn't resist taking a shot at Microsoft while accepting their own share of the blame, saying "As you might imagine, we are upset at Windows for not being more hardy against such viruses, and even more upset with ourselves for not catching it."

 

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