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Extract Directly from Time Machine

Normally you use Time Machine to restore lost data in a file like this: within the Time Machine interface, you go back to the time the file was not yet messed up, and you restore it to replace the file you have now.

You can also elect to keep both, but the restored file takes the name and place of the current one. So, if you have made changes since the backup took place that you would like to keep, they are lost, or you have to mess around a bit to merge changes, rename files, and trash the unwanted one.

As an alternative, you can browse the Time Machine backup volume directly in the Finder like any normal disk, navigate through the chronological backup hierarchy, and find the file which contains the lost content.

Once you've found it, you can open it and the current version of the file side-by-side, and copy information from Time Machine's version of the file into the current one, without losing any content you put in it since the backup was made.

Submitted by
Eolake Stobblehouse

 

 

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Microsoft Releases Office 2004, Office X Updates

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Microsoft's Macintosh Business Unit (also known as MacBU) wrapped up 2006 by releasing updates to its core suite of productivity applications. Office 2004 for Mac 11.3.2 Update, a 13.7 MB download, fixes a problem that could cause PowerPoint 2004 to unexpectedly quit. Entourage 2004 now correctly handles contact names with special characters, corrects a problem with duplicated messages in public folders, and improves compatibility with Mirapoint Message Server. The update requires Office 2004 for Mac 11.3.0 Update (57.6 MB), which was released in October 2006 and provided bug fixes and patched security vulnerabilities.

Owners of the earlier Office X can download Office for Mac Update (2006-12-19), a 3.33 MB download that fixes the stability issue in PowerPoint noted above.

 

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