Thoughtful, detailed coverage of the Mac, iPhone, and iPad, plus the best-selling Take Control ebooks.

 

 

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Removing Photos from iPhoto

Despite iPhoto's long history, many people continue to be confused about exactly what happens when you delete a photo. There are three possibilities.

If you delete a photo from an album, book, card, calendar, or saved slideshow, the photo is merely removed from that item and remains generally available in your iPhoto library.

If, however, you delete a photo while in Events or Photos view, that act moves the photo to iPhoto's Trash. It's still available, but...

If you then empty iPhoto's Trash, all photos in it will be deleted from the iPhoto library and from your hard disk.

Visit iPhoto '08: Visual QuickStart Guide

 
 

Take Control News/23-Apr-07

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.Mac Ebook Update Covers Latest in .Mac Webmail Access -- We just released version 1.2 of our comprehensive guide to Apple's .Mac service, "Take Control of .Mac." Written by Joe Kissell, the 204-page ebook provides everything .Mac users need to know to get the most of their $100-per-year subscriptions. Along with a smattering of general changes, this new version provides up-to-date advice and steps for using .Mac's webmail features. The update is free to current owners of the ebook (click the Check for Updates button on the cover to access it); new copies cost $15.

To give you a taste of what's in the book, here are a few tips you might find useful:

  • Email aliases behave a bit differently from member names. If you create an email alias and later delete it (as opposed to merely turning it off), that email address is reserved permanently, but you cannot reactivate it - and neither can anyone else.
  • To make it even easier for others to access files in your Public folder, tell them to visit http://idisk.mac.com/membername-Public. That URL displays a Web page that provides download links for each item in your Public folder.
  • Even if you use only a single Mac all the time, .Mac bookmarks can be very helpful if you use a variety of browsers. Instead of storing bookmarks separately in Firefox, OmniWeb, Opera, and iCab (or whatever browsers you use), you can simply open your .Mac bookmarks Web page in each of those browsers. You'll get access to your Safari bookmarks, and any new bookmarks you add using the .Mac Bookmarks window will also appear in Safari (after they've been synchronized, of course).

If you're in need of up-to-date documentation of how to use .Mac's features, look no further.

 

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