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Extract Directly from Time Machine

Normally you use Time Machine to restore lost data in a file like this: within the Time Machine interface, you go back to the time the file was not yet messed up, and you restore it to replace the file you have now.

You can also elect to keep both, but the restored file takes the name and place of the current one. So, if you have made changes since the backup took place that you would like to keep, they are lost, or you have to mess around a bit to merge changes, rename files, and trash the unwanted one.

As an alternative, you can browse the Time Machine backup volume directly in the Finder like any normal disk, navigate through the chronological backup hierarchy, and find the file which contains the lost content.

Once you've found it, you can open it and the current version of the file side-by-side, and copy information from Time Machine's version of the file into the current one, without losing any content you put in it since the backup was made.

Submitted by
Eolake Stobblehouse

 
 

Adobe Ships Rest of Creative Suite 3

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Adobe Systems has broken with tradition by releasing products promised for third quarter of 2007 on the second day of that quarter. A quarter-based release typically means "as close to the last day of the quarter as possible so we can book the revenue in that quarter."

In April, Adobe released 9 of the 13 main applications that form Creative Suite 3 (CS3) as both individual programs and 6 editions (see "Adobe Announces Creative Suite 3 Plans, Pricing, Dates," 2007-04-02, and "Adobe Ships Creative Suite 3, Offers Video Betas," 2007-04-16). The released programs spanned their entire print and online range, including Photoshop (in two versions, no less), InDesign, and Dreamweaver. The company then promised four video and audio tools and support applications by the third quarter of this year.

Today, Adobe shipped After Effects, Premiere Pro, Soundbooth, and Encore for Intel-based Macs and Windows XP and Vista, along with two Windows-only applications, OnLocation and Ultra. OnLocation, a direct-to-disk recording tool, works with Boot Camp, Adobe says. The two delayed editions are now shipping, too: Production Premium ($1,700) and Master Suite ($2,500). Master Suite contains the entire CS3 line of products.

 

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