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Extract Directly from Time Machine

Normally you use Time Machine to restore lost data in a file like this: within the Time Machine interface, you go back to the time the file was not yet messed up, and you restore it to replace the file you have now.

You can also elect to keep both, but the restored file takes the name and place of the current one. So, if you have made changes since the backup took place that you would like to keep, they are lost, or you have to mess around a bit to merge changes, rename files, and trash the unwanted one.

As an alternative, you can browse the Time Machine backup volume directly in the Finder like any normal disk, navigate through the chronological backup hierarchy, and find the file which contains the lost content.

Once you've found it, you can open it and the current version of the file side-by-side, and copy information from Time Machine's version of the file into the current one, without losing any content you put in it since the backup was made.

Submitted by
Eolake Stobblehouse

 

 

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Handsfree iPhone Call Leads to Ticket

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I was driving from Cherrydale to Ballston, Virginia, last week talking on my cell phone to my brother, who was wishing me a happy birthday. Being a safe driver, I was using the stock headset that shipped with my iPhone so that I could keep both hands on the wheel and give maximum attention to my driving.

Two Arlington County police cars, operated by Officers Wright and Horvath, pulled up alongside me on Lee Highway and proceeded to follow me as I turned left and proceeded south on Glebe Road. Just before the intersection with Wilson Boulevard, Officer Wright turned his lights on and signaled me to pull over, which I did.

"License and registration."

Mindful that I had two officers tailing me, I couldn't think of any traffic laws that I had violated: "Officer, why did you pull me over?"

"Under Virginia State Law it is illegal to wear headphones," he replied.

"I'm wearing the hands-free device that came with my iPhone," I said, and I showed him my iPhone.

Officer Wright took my license and proceeded back to his cruiser.

Meanwhile, Officer Horvath came up to my window and asked to see my headphones. And I showed him the iPhone, the headphones, and the docking cable I have installed in my truck to play my iPhone or iPod through my stereo.

Officer Horvath then walked back to Officer Wright's cruiser without saying anything.

Now considering that in jurisdictions like Washington, D.C., and New York, it is mandatory that one use a hands-free device with a cell phone, it struck me as very odd that here I am in Virginia being pulled over for using one.

Yet, as you can see from the picture of my summons, using a hands-free device in the State of Virginia can be legally problematic.

[John sent this story via email, and we reproduced it with his permission. He notes that he didn't try to get out of the ticket, because he'd like to see how this plays out. -Glenn]

 

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