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Extract Directly from Time Machine

Normally you use Time Machine to restore lost data in a file like this: within the Time Machine interface, you go back to the time the file was not yet messed up, and you restore it to replace the file you have now.

You can also elect to keep both, but the restored file takes the name and place of the current one. So, if you have made changes since the backup took place that you would like to keep, they are lost, or you have to mess around a bit to merge changes, rename files, and trash the unwanted one.

As an alternative, you can browse the Time Machine backup volume directly in the Finder like any normal disk, navigate through the chronological backup hierarchy, and find the file which contains the lost content.

Once you've found it, you can open it and the current version of the file side-by-side, and copy information from Time Machine's version of the file into the current one, without losing any content you put in it since the backup was made.

Submitted by
Eolake Stobblehouse

 
 

Apple Releases Mac OS X 10.4.11 with Safari 3

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Safari 3 has been released for Tiger, along with a host of security updates and bug fixes, as part of the Mac OS X 10.4.11 update. The updates are mammoth: update for PowerPC (67.9 MB), combo update for PowerPC (180.8 MB), update for Intel (128 MB), and combo update for Intel (321.5 MB). That last update would take 18 hours to download over a dial-up modem or 3 minutes via a home fiber link. Mac OS X 10.3 Panther also received a revised security update - 2007-008 - for its terminal 10.3.9 release (client, 49 MB; server, 63.4 MB).

The list of security updates and bug fixes is long. Many of the security updates are rather important, fixing six kernel-level bugs. Malicious Flash content could allow a machine to be taken over, and Apple has updated Tiger to use version 9.0.47.0 of Flash Player, which is also available separately. It's worth noting that a few of the WebCore fixes are credited to a Google employee, reflecting Google's use of the WebKit (which underlies Safari) for the Android mobile-phone platform (see "Google's View of Our Cell Phone Future Is an Android, Not a GPhone," 2007-11-12).

On the non-security side, the list is more modest except for the inclusion of Safari 3 for Tiger. Many of the issues are relatively minor, although important to those that they affect. Our Kiwi friends might be happy to see that Apple, months too late, has finally provided the correct updates for Daylight Saving Time for their nation (see "Daylight Saving Time Rules Fixed for New Zealand," 2007-09-20.)

Apple also updated the Safari 3 beta for Windows XP and Vista to fix a number of security problems found in both the Mac OS X and Windows versions, as well as to add a vast amount of feature refinement. The list of new and improved items is rather extensive, including basic functionality like printing page numbers and more important features such as listing FTP directories and managing cookies.

 

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