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iMovie '09: Speed Clips up to 2,000%

iMovie '09 brings back the capability to speed up or slow down clips, which went missing in iMovie '08. Select a clip and bring up the Clip Inspector by double-clicking the clip, clicking the Inspector button on the toolbar, or pressing the I key. Just as with its last appearance in iMovie HD 6, you can move a slider to make the video play back slower or faster (indicated by a turtle or hare icon).

You can also enter a value into the text field to the right of the slider, and this is where things get interesting. You're not limited to the tick mark values on the slider, so you can set the speed to be 118% of normal if you want. The field below that tells you the clip's changed duration.

But you can also exceed the boundaries of the speed slider. Enter any number between 5% and 2000%, then click Done.

Visit iMovie '09 Visual QuickStart Guide

 

 

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QuickTime 7.4 Improves Security, but Not Enough

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Apple updated its media workhorse QuickTime to version 7.4 last week, fixing bugs and adding support for new iTunes features such as downloadable movie rentals. But the more important news is that this version squashes a handful of security holes that could allow remote attacks. However, a serious vulnerability discovered shortly before Macworld Expo demonstrates that Apple's engineers need to remain hard at work.

The QuickTime 7.4 update is available for Leopard (a 55 MB download), Tiger (a 51 MB download), Panther (a 50 MB download), and Windows (both XP and Vista, a 22 MB download).

The most recent exploit, not addressed in QuickTime 7.4, takes advantage of a hole in QuickTime's RTSP (Real Time Streaming Protocol) that could open a computer to a denial-of-service attack or possible remote code execution. (RTSP is not a new target; see "Protect Yourself from the QuickTime RTSP Vulnerability," 2007-09-07.) Because QuickTime is the underlying technology of iTunes, Macs and Windows computers running QuickTime are vulnerable. Anyone who uses iTunes or owns an iPod should update.

 

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