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Removing Photos from iPhoto

Despite iPhoto's long history, many people continue to be confused about exactly what happens when you delete a photo. There are three possibilities.

If you delete a photo from an album, book, card, calendar, or saved slideshow, the photo is merely removed from that item and remains generally available in your iPhoto library.

If, however, you delete a photo while in Events or Photos view, that act moves the photo to iPhoto's Trash. It's still available, but...

If you then empty iPhoto's Trash, all photos in it will be deleted from the iPhoto library and from your hard disk.

Visit iPhoto '08: Visual QuickStart Guide

 

 

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Aperture 2.0.1 Update Enhanced by AppleScript

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Maintenance updates generally don't offer much more than bug fixes, which makes last week's release of Aperture 2.0.1 stand out. The update provides an array of performance and stability improvements (called out by category, though, without specifics of what was changed), and Apple also rolled in enhanced AppleScript support.

A page in the AppleScript section of the company's Web site demonstrates how a page layout program such as Adobe InDesign CS3 can fetch an image directly from the Aperture library, using the photo's generated preview within the InDesign document. When the image is edited in Aperture, the changes are reflected in InDesign without re-importing the new version. A video explains fingerprinted previews, the new method that Aperture uses to keep its previews and source files linked together using unique identifying codes.

(Incidentally, the two videos on that page use Apple's Victoria text-to-speech voice for the narration instead of a human voiceover, a practice I've not noticed before. It took a few seconds to pick out what was "wrong" - the occasional clipped words and odd pronunciations that indicated an artificial voice.)

Aperture 2.0.1 is available via Software Update or as a 43.9 MB standalone download (a valid serial number is required to download the latter version).

 

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