Thoughtful, detailed coverage of the Mac, iPhone, and iPad, plus the best-selling Take Control ebooks.

 

 

Author Biography

Charles Edge has written 9 books and over 3,000 blog posts on technology, with a focus on large-scale systems and server management. He is the Chief Technology Officer of 318, a national consultancy and managed services provider with a focus on the Apple platform. When not playing with computers at work, he can probably be found tinkering with computers for fun.

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Pick an apple! 
 
Extract Directly from Time Machine

Normally you use Time Machine to restore lost data in a file like this: within the Time Machine interface, you go back to the time the file was not yet messed up, and you restore it to replace the file you have now.

You can also elect to keep both, but the restored file takes the name and place of the current one. So, if you have made changes since the backup took place that you would like to keep, they are lost, or you have to mess around a bit to merge changes, rename files, and trash the unwanted one.

As an alternative, you can browse the Time Machine backup volume directly in the Finder like any normal disk, navigate through the chronological backup hierarchy, and find the file which contains the lost content.

Once you've found it, you can open it and the current version of the file side-by-side, and copy information from Time Machine's version of the file into the current one, without losing any content you put in it since the backup was made.

Submitted by
Eolake Stobblehouse

 
 

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Take Control of OS X Server, Chapter 7: Collaboration Services

Take Control of OS X Server, Chapter 6: File Sharing

Take Control of OS X Server, Chapter 5: DNS Service

Take Control of OS X Server, Chapter 4: Directory Services

Take Control of OS X Server, Chapter 3: Preparation and Installation

Take Control of OS X Server, Chapter 1: Introducing OS X Server

Take Control of OS X Server, Chapter 2: Choosing Server Hardware