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Mysteriously Moving Margins in Word

In Microsoft Word 2008 (and older versions), if you put your cursor in a paragraph and then move a tab or indent marker in the ruler, the change applies to just that paragraph. If your markers are closely spaced, you may have trouble grabbing the right one, and inadvertently work with tabs when you want to work with indents, or vice-versa. The solution is to hover your mouse over the marker until a yellow tooltip confirms which element you're about to drag.

I recently came to appreciate the importance of waiting for those tooltips: a document mysteriously reset its margins several times while I was under deadline pressure, causing a variety of problems. After several hours of puzzlement, I had my "doh!" moment: I had been dragging a margin marker when I thought I was dragging an indent marker.

When it comes to moving markers in the Word ruler, the moral of the story is always to hover, read, and only then drag.

 
 

Fix Your Fonts in Safari 6

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As those who have installed Safari 6 (which comes with OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion) have discovered, the capability to set the browser’s default proportional font and the default fixed-width font has vanished from Safari’s preferences. As a result, some sites — specifically those that don’t set their own fonts using CSS (Cascading Style Sheets) — have begun appearing in Times and Courier, regardless of the default font settings a user may have set in a previous version of Safari.

Two solutions are available. The first is for users to create a default CSS file that Safari can use. This document, a text file with the file extension .css, can be stored anywhere; users simply need to point to it from the Style Sheet setting in Safari’s Advanced preferences. The contents of such a CSS document might look something like this:

body { font-family: "Lucida Grande"; }
code, tt { font-family: "Consolas"; font-size: 90%; }

With the style sheet in place, after Safari is quit and relaunched it uses the specified fonts for body text and code text if a page’s HTML and CSS don’t specify otherwise.

However, one can also set Safari’s default fonts with shell commands using Terminal. Even though the user interface for setting these defaults has vanished, Safari still has them. The magic shell command is defaults and it takes four uses of it to set the defaults that one formerly set in Safari’s preferences. All one needs to do is open Terminal and issue the appropriate commands on the command line, and then quit and relaunch Safari.

For example, here is how I set my default fonts to Lucida Grande (proportional) and Consolas (fixed-width). First is the command to set the proportional font family (each of these is a single line):

defaults write com.apple.Safari com.apple.Safari.ContentPageGroupIdentifier.WebKit2StandardFontFamily 'Lucida Grande'

Next is the command to set that font’s default size:

defaults write com.apple.Safari com.apple.Safari.ContentPageGroupIdentifier.WebKit2DefaultFontSize 14

Then one issues a similar command for the fixed-width font:

defaults write com.apple.Safari com.apple.Safari.ContentPageGroupIdentifier.WebKit2FixedFontFamily 'Consolas'

And another for the fixed-width font size:

defaults write com.apple.Safari com.apple.Safari.ContentPageGroupIdentifier.WebKit2DefaultFixedFontSize 11

Granted, opening Terminal and pasting esoteric commands instead of using a graphical interface is not a usability win, but at least you need not be forced to view Times when you want Lucida Grande!

(A brief aside. I like to tweak how pages look, so although I can use Terminal to try out different default font and size combinations, I have found it more convenient to make a TextExpander shell script snippet that I can use to set and reset font defaults. The shell script snippet uses the same syntax as the Terminal commands but can be edited and invoked far more quickly. Plus, it makes a satisfying “pop” sound when it’s done.)

Check out the Take Control ebooks that expand on the topic in this article:

Put more effort into creative thought and less into repetitive typing with TextExpander 4, the award-winning text expansion utility from Smile. Whether you want to type faster or you already use TextExpander but want to harness its power more fully, let author Michael Cohen help you save time and lead you to typing nirvana.

 

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Comments about Fix Your Fonts in Safari 6
(Comments are closed.)

Silly workaround. Apple should put this feature back. Until they do, it's Chrome for me.
Michael E. Cohen  An apple icon for a TidBITS Staffer 2012-08-14 18:18
That the problem exists is silly. That there is a simple solution, albeit geeky, is not.
If the problem is silly, then any "solution" for it is silly.
Michael E. Cohen  An apple icon for a TidBITS Staffer 2012-08-15 19:47
That's just silly.
So moving to Chrome is silly, as well.
Steve Nicholson  2012-08-14 20:40
That sure seems like a bug to me: rdar://12100578. http://openradar.appspot.com/radar?id=1854411
Michael E. Cohen  An apple icon for a TidBITS Staffer 2012-08-14 20:46
Thanks for filing.
Tom Knoff  2012-08-14 22:30
Never new this until now, TidBits is a great site to test your css on!
Why is Apple removing valuable features? First Save as… (people in design and creative fields *really* need this as part of the creative and production process) and now Safari crippling. Is this intentional, incompetence, or poor user experience leadership?

Continued use of Chrome and Firefox and Snow Leopard indeed.