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Extract Directly from Time Machine

Normally you use Time Machine to restore lost data in a file like this: within the Time Machine interface, you go back to the time the file was not yet messed up, and you restore it to replace the file you have now.

You can also elect to keep both, but the restored file takes the name and place of the current one. So, if you have made changes since the backup took place that you would like to keep, they are lost, or you have to mess around a bit to merge changes, rename files, and trash the unwanted one.

As an alternative, you can browse the Time Machine backup volume directly in the Finder like any normal disk, navigate through the chronological backup hierarchy, and find the file which contains the lost content.

Once you've found it, you can open it and the current version of the file side-by-side, and copy information from Time Machine's version of the file into the current one, without losing any content you put in it since the backup was made.

Submitted by
Eolake Stobblehouse

 
 

FunBITS: Star Walk for iPhone and iPad

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With Independence Day having come and gone in the United States, most of us won’t be seeing fireworks for another year. But there’s an entire universe of pretty lights in the night sky. If you’re looking for a reason to take the family outside and stare up into the darkness, pick up a copy of Vito Technology’s Star Walk for iPhone in the App Store for $2.99. Star Walk for iPad is a separate purchase, also $2.99.

Star Walk is far from new — it was originally released in 2008 for iPhone and 2010 for iPad, and it’s up to version 6.2.1. But if you’ve never heard of it, or bought it years ago and forgot about it, then this is the perfect time to give it a try.

Open Star Walk and you’re presented with the entire night sky, including stars, planets, and even satellites. As you approach constellations, an outline appears of what the constellation represents, like Gemini. You can swipe to move around and pinch to zoom in on celestial objects of interest. Tapping an object displays a cornucopia of information about it, including pictures and trivia. You can even set astronomical events on your calendar so you don’t miss anything.



While browsing the universe, the bar on the left of the screen lets you cycle through various spectra of light, such as ultraviolet and infrared. The clock in the upper-right hand of the screen acts as a time machine, letting you see how the sky will look at any given time — past or future.



That’s all impressive enough, but if you point your device at the sky, that’s when the magic happens. Suddenly Star Walk turns your device into a window onto the universe, controlled by your device’s built-in gyroscope. Even in your living room, Star Walk will show you what the section of the universe you’re pointing at looks like at a given moment. It’s truly awesome.

Star Walk also features an augmented reality mode, activated by two buttons in the upper-right corner. One button turns on the camera, showing you stars and planets overlaid over whatever you’re looking at. Another lets you align what’s on the screen with what you’re seeing, such as the sun or moon, so you can be sure Star Walk is lined up with the sky.


Star Walk might not be the newest app on the block, but it’s mature, packed with features, and a lot of fun. It’s a great excuse to get outdoors on a warm summer night and a wonderful way to introduce children to astronomy.

 

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