Thoughtful, detailed coverage of the Mac, iPhone, and iPad, plus the best-selling Take Control ebooks.

 

 

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Open Files with Finder's App Switcher

Say you're in the Finder looking at a file and you want to open it with an application that's already running but which doesn't own that particular document. How? Switch to that app and choose File > Open? Too many steps. Choose Open With from the file's contextual menu? Takes too long, and the app might not be listed. Drag the file to the Dock and drop it onto the app's icon? The icon might be hard to find; worse, you might miss.

In Leopard there's a new solution: use the Command-Tab switcher. Yes, the Command-Tab switcher accepts drag-and-drop! The gesture required is a bit tricky. Start dragging the file in the Finder: move the file, but don't let up on the mouse button. With your other hand, press Command-Tab to summon the switcher, and don't let up on the Command key. Drag the file onto the application's icon in the switcher and let go of the mouse. (Now you can let go of the Command key too.) Extra tip: If you switch to the app beforehand, its icon in the Command-Tab switcher will be easy to find; it will be first (or second).

Visit Take Control of Customizing Leopard

 
 

Chapter 9 of “Take Control of Apple TV” Available

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It’s easy to write off the Apple TV as being just for entertainment — whether watching movies from Netflix, playing music from iTunes Radio, or showing off your vacation photos from Flickr. But step back for a moment and consider the fact that the Apple TV can act as an AirPlay conduit that enables you to display an iPad or iPhone screen on a large-screen TV, projector, or classroom SMART Board. If you travel frequently to give presentations, tossing a tiny Apple TV in your bag might mean the difference between being able to connect to a random projector and forcing everyone to crowd around your iPad.

In Chapter 9, “Present with Apple TV,” of “Take Control of Apple TV,” Josh Centers explains what adapters and cables you’ll need to ensure that you can connect an Apple TV to whatever display you run across. He then provides tips on how to get Keynote presentations to your iOS device, how to show paper or physical objects on the big screen via the iOS device’s camera (there’s an app for that), and how to loop in a remote presenter. Josh also explains how the Apple TV’s Conference Room Display mode works — it’s designed to help random people figure out how to connect to an Apple TV located in a shared conference room.

As always, Chapter 1, “Introducing Apple TV,” is available for everyone to read, to see what “Take Control of Apple TV” is slated to cover. In a few more weeks, it will be available in PDF, EPUB, and Mobipocket (Kindle) formats, and TidBITS members can save 30 percent on this and all other Take Control titles. In the meantime, TidBITS members can read and comment on the following chapters:

We hope our TidBITS members have been enjoying this early look at “Take Control of Apple TV,” and if you haven’t yet joined the TidBITS membership program, this early access is only one of a number of perks we provide to thank you for your support. We don’t have the deep pockets of a corporate media behemoth, so support from our readers provides the majority of our funding and makes it possible for us to keep bringing you TidBITS each week. To get a sense what the TidBITS membership program means to us, see “Support TidBITS in 2014 via the TidBITS Membership Program” (9 December 2013).

 

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