Thoughtful, detailed coverage of the Mac, iPhone, and iPad, plus the best-selling Take Control ebooks.

 

 

Pick an apple! 
 
Extract Directly from Time Machine

Normally you use Time Machine to restore lost data in a file like this: within the Time Machine interface, you go back to the time the file was not yet messed up, and you restore it to replace the file you have now.

You can also elect to keep both, but the restored file takes the name and place of the current one. So, if you have made changes since the backup took place that you would like to keep, they are lost, or you have to mess around a bit to merge changes, rename files, and trash the unwanted one.

As an alternative, you can browse the Time Machine backup volume directly in the Finder like any normal disk, navigate through the chronological backup hierarchy, and find the file which contains the lost content.

Once you've found it, you can open it and the current version of the file side-by-side, and copy information from Time Machine's version of the file into the current one, without losing any content you put in it since the backup was made.

Submitted by
Eolake Stobblehouse

 
 
Previous: TidBITS 1043 Next: TidBITS 1045

iOS 4.1: Does it Work? Should You Install It?

iOS 4.1 is out, and Tonya Engst installs it to see if it fixes performance issues with the iPhone 3G. The good news is that it appears to, while simultaneously bringing useful features to all iOS 4-capable devices.Show full article

Apple Eases iOS Restrictions, Publishes Review Guidelines

In a move that could be construed as reducing exposure to antitrust scrutiny, Apple has announced changes to the iOS Developer License Agreement. Simultaneously, the company has released the App Store Review Guidelines and created an App Review Board to bring transparency to the iOS app approval process.Show full article

Look Your Best with an iPad Photo Portfolio

Photographer Jeff Lynch switched from carrying a printed portfolio of his work to an iPad, and discovered that making a compelling digital portfolio involves more than just importing your photos.Show full article

The Data Rescue Center Sponsoring TidBITS

Please welcome our latest TidBITS sponsor, the data-recovery company The Data Rescue Center. They specialize in data recovery from damaged hard drives along with "rescuing" data from inaccessible digital drive types, old videotapes and cassette tapes, and even analog photos.Show full article

DealBITS Discount: Save $20 on Raskin 1.1

See who won copies of Raskin 1.1 in last week's DealBITS drawing, and if you're not among them, read on to save $20 on Raskin Software's alternative interface. Show full article

What's Wrong with Digital Cameras

Charles Maurer describes a fundamental problem with today's digital cameras, provides some insight into a professional's approach to photography, and reviews two small cameras that he recently bought.Show full article

TidBITS Watchlist: Notable Software Updates for 13 September 2010

Notable software releases this week include Carbon Copy Cloner 3.3.4, Firefox 3.6.9, PDFpen/PDFpenPro 5.0.1, Safari 5.0.2/4.1.2, iWeb 3.0.2, and Cyberduck 3.6.1.Show full article

ExtraBITS for 13 September 2010

If you're looking for some commute-time listening, Adam was a guest on both MacBreak Weekly and the Tech Night Owl Live this past week, talking in both cases about the recent Apple announcements. Also, for those considering a new iPod nano, note that you can now easily turn it into a wristwatch, and if you're wondering what happened to VersionTracker, it was subsumed into CNET Downloads.Show full article

Show the full text of all articles