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Extract Directly from Time Machine

Normally you use Time Machine to restore lost data in a file like this: within the Time Machine interface, you go back to the time the file was not yet messed up, and you restore it to replace the file you have now.

You can also elect to keep both, but the restored file takes the name and place of the current one. So, if you have made changes since the backup took place that you would like to keep, they are lost, or you have to mess around a bit to merge changes, rename files, and trash the unwanted one.

As an alternative, you can browse the Time Machine backup volume directly in the Finder like any normal disk, navigate through the chronological backup hierarchy, and find the file which contains the lost content.

Once you've found it, you can open it and the current version of the file side-by-side, and copy information from Time Machine's version of the file into the current one, without losing any content you put in it since the backup was made.

Submitted by
Eolake Stobblehouse

 
 
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ExtraBITS for 25 October 2010

Our review copy of iPhoto ’11 hasn’t yet arrived, but we felt it was important to warn about a potential bug in the program that could erase photos—make backups! Also, if you haven’t yet had your fill of analysis of the Apple announcements, listen in to Adam’s interview on the Tech Night Owl Live podcast. And finally, want to turn a Mac into a Mac-O-Lantern for Halloween? Read on!Show full article

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