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Enabling Auto Spelling Correction in Snow Leopard

In Snow Leopard, the automatic spelling correction in applications is not usually activated by default. To turn it on, make sure the cursor's insertion point is somewhere where text can be entered, and either choose Edit > Spelling and Grammar > Correct Spelling Automatically or, if the Edit menu's submenu doesn't have what you need, Control-click where you're typing and choose Spelling and Grammar > Correct Spelling Automatically from the contextual menu that appears. The latter approach is particularly likely to be necessary in Safari and other WebKit-based applications, like Mailplane.

Submitted by
Doug McLean

 
 
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Administrivia

Of course, the hot news for the week is Apple's announcement of Newton, which is both a technology and the first Personal Digital Assistant. We have received a ton of information from lots of helpful people, but we had neither the time nor the space to report on Newton this weekShow full article

AppleShare Upgrades

AppleShare Upgrades -- It seems that Apple really wants everyone to upgrade to AppleShare 3.0 and has extended the upgrade program to 31-Jul-92. Apple claims they mean it this time, so this may well be your last chance to upgrade at a discountShow full article

WWDC Cool Stuff

Apple recently held its Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC), which is where they show the latest and greatest to all the developers who work on Macintosh productsShow full article

Word Style Flaws

A few weeks ago I received a call from Prudence Holliger of Seattle's Mac Downtown Business Users' Group. Prudence was not happy and it was definitely Word 5.0's faultShow full article

QuickRing Speed

Let's face it, we computer users are greedy. We always want more power, more speed, and more time. Luckily the more advanced people at Apple (not the geniuses who gave us the crippled Classic) think along the same lines and have come up with a new technology called QuickRing, which promises to significantly enhance the Mac's utility in some data transfer-intensive tasks. Each successive generation of Macs runs faster than the last, but the Macintosh still some notable bottlenecks, including SCSI, the memory subsystem, and the processor itselfShow full article

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