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Open Files from BBEdit Subversion Log

When you use BBEdit's Subversion client capabilities to update the working copy of your Subversion repository, BBEdit always displays the Subversion.log file, showing any changes. If you want to work on one of the files that appears as being added or updated, just select the full pathname and choose File > Open Selection (or just hit Command-D). This trick should also work any time you see a pathname within a BBEdit document.

 
 
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Performa Mail

Performa Mail -- Bill Waits, who provided us with some of the information we used in last week's bit about new Performas, asks that people please stop requesting more information, especially about the Performa 430 and the modems, about which he has no informationShow full article

Macintosh Easy Open

Macintosh Easy Open, an extension from Apple which allows you to substitute eligible applications to open files created by applications you don't have, is now available with MacLinkPlusShow full article

New INIT 17 Virus Busted

Technical Support Coordinator, BAKA Computers In a joint bulletin released today by Gene Spafford of Purdue University, the various Macintosh antiviral developers announced the discovery of a new virus earlier along with new utility versions to combat it. The new virus, dubbed INIT 17, infects the System file and most applications as they run, and is likely to spread quickly once a machine is exposed to the virusShow full article

PowerBook Panegyric

Definition: PowerBook 100 - a terribly nice Macintosh sometimes mistaken for a low-end, powerless laptop. What happened to the PowerBook 100? It came out in September 1991 at an unaffordable priceShow full article

Double the Trouble?

A friend had problems with his Duo 210 recently, and I thought a brief exposition of how we solved them might prove useful to Duo users and anyone who does trouble-shootingShow full article

CMaster Review

President, Johnston/Johnston Consulting, Macintosh Developer Jersey Scientific's CMaster is an extension for Symantec's THINK C that is 90 percent enhancements to THINK C's rather austere editor, and 10 percent enhancements to THINK C's project environmentShow full article

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