Thoughtful, detailed coverage of the Mac, iPhone, and iPad, plus the best-selling Take Control ebooks.



Pick an apple! 
Is it a Unicode Font?

To determine if your font is Unicode-compliant, with all its characters coded and mapped correctly, choose the Font in any program (or in Font Book, set the preview area to Custom (Preview > Custom), and type Option-Shift-2.

If you get a euro character (a sort of uppercase C with two horizontal lines through its midsection), it's 99.9 percent certain the font is Unicode-compliant. If you get a graphic character that's gray rounded-rectangle frame with a euro character inside it, the font is definitely not Unicode-compliant. (The fact that the image has a euro sign in it is only coincidental: it's the image used for any missing currency sign.)

This assumes that you're using U.S. input keyboard, which is a little ironic when the euro symbol is the test. With the British keyboard, for instance, Option-2 produces the euro symbol if it's part of the font.

Visit Take Control of Fonts in Leopard

Submitted by
Sharon Zardetto

Previous: TidBITS 240 Next: TidBITS 242


The quote of the week goes to Bill Gates, who was paraphrased in a MacWEEK article in the 22-Aug-94 issue as saying that no company has produced more titles for Power Macs [than Microsoft]Show full article


LISTSERV Reminder -- Just as a quick reminder, you can subscribe to TidBITS via an Internet mailing list (yes, this works for people on America Online, CompuServe, and so on)Show full article

Submitting to TidBITS

Submitting to TidBITS -- I just ran into a situation that I feel bad about, and I hope this note might help matters in the future. Someone sent me email about a product he had used and liked, and several issues later, Mark independently wrote an article about the same productShow full article

Display Card 24AC

Display Card 24AC software is now available for Power Mac users; version 1.2 of the video card driver supports Power Macintosh. Version 1.1 was compatible with Power Macintosh hardware, but ran slowly because it was 680x0 code running in emulationShow full article

Joshua Weinberg

Joshua Weinberg writes to say that he purchased System 7.5 for $99 last Saturday at CompUSA in New York City. Although he noted that the CompUSA folks said they had gotten System 7.5 in ten days early, it sounds like it will be available for the masses soonShow full article

Fat Binary Comments

Many people wrote in to comment on my article about fat binaries in TidBITS-240, in the process raising a few issues that I hadn't previously considered. Peter Lewis notes: The Umich archive people said they don't want two different versions at , so a fat binary is pretty much the only choiceShow full article

After Dark Contest

The deadline for this year's Berkeley Systems After Dark module contest is 14-Oct-94, and the prizes look pretty good. The contest has four categories and only one requires you to know anything about programming. In the Programming category you must program either a Macintosh module or a Windows moduleShow full article

Video Without Holes

Director of Technical Services, Baka Industries Inc. By early 1992, there were multiple video output options for the suddenly popular PowerBooksShow full article

Timbuktu Pro

[Excerpted from Internet Starter Kit for Macintosh, 2nd edition.] As time goes by in the Internet world, software that once ran solely on local area networks such as LocalTalk or Ethernet is migrating to the InternetShow full article

Show the full text of all articles