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Open Files from BBEdit Subversion Log

When you use BBEdit's Subversion client capabilities to update the working copy of your Subversion repository, BBEdit always displays the Subversion.log file, showing any changes. If you want to work on one of the files that appears as being added or updated, just select the full pathname and choose File > Open Selection (or just hit Command-D). This trick should also work any time you see a pathname within a BBEdit document.

 
 
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Disable the CFM-68K Runtime Enabler

Disable the CFM-68K Runtime Enabler -- If you use a Macintosh with a 68K processor, Apple is recommending that you disable the CFM-68K Runtime Enabler either by using an extensions manager or by removing it from your System FolderShow full article

BBEdit Lite for OpenDoc

BBEdit Lite for OpenDoc -- If you've installed version 1.1 of OpenDoc, then you might want to take note of BBEdit Lite for OpenDoc, a freeware Live Object which includes BBEdit's basic text-editing capabilitiesShow full article

QuickMail Express Available

QuickMail Express Available -- CE Software has released the free Internet mail client we mentioned a few weeks ago. QuickMail Express is a less powerful version of QuickMail Pro, their commercial POP3 client, and both are available for Macintosh and WindowsShow full article

TidBITS on Tape

TidBITS recently signed a licensing agreement with AudioMagNet, a new company that provides the service of converting Internet texts to audio cassette, using a 16-bit computer voiceShow full article

The Power Key Mystery

This story starts back in July, when Geoff and I installed a Power Macintosh 7100/66 in the offices of Point of Presence Company, where our main Web and mail server (an Apple Workgroup Server 6150) also livesShow full article

Adobe Grinds Out PageMill 2.0

Adobe PageMill 1.0 took the HTML world by storm when it shipped in late 1995. At the time, unlike anything else available, PageMill was able to generate HTML quietly while users set up Web pages in an environment resembling a simple word processorShow full article

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