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Option-Click AirPort Menu for Network Details

If you hold down the Option key while clicking the AirPort menu in Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard, you'll see not just the names of nearby Wi-Fi networks, but additional details about the selected network. Details include the MAC address of the network, the channel used by the base station, the signal strength (a negative number; the closer to zero it is, the stronger the signal), and the transmit rate in megabits per second showing actual network throughput. If you hover the cursor over the name of a network to which you're not connected, a little yellow pop-up shows the signal strength and type of encryption.

 
 
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Disinfectant 3.7.1

Disinfectant 3.7.1 -- On the heels of last week's Disinfectant 3.7, John Norstad has released Disinfectant 3.7.1, which corrects an error that could cause a crash while scanning some rare types of large resource filesShow full article

Amelio & Hancock Resign from Apple

On 09-Jul-97, Apple Computer announced Gilbert Amelio had resigned as CEO and chairman of Apple Computer. Amelio replaced Michael Spindler as Apple CEO in February of 1996, making his tenure at Apple slightly more than 17 monthsShow full article

Cougar Slinks Into View

Those who regularly visit the Web site of the W3C (World Wide Web Consortium) have seen hints about the next version of HTML, codenamed Cougar. Last week, the W3C updated and consolidated those scattered hints by releasing them in a public draft of HTML 4.0Show full article

Feeling Lost? An Overview of Global Positioning Systems

Until about five years ago, the Global Positioning System (GPS) existed in the realm of high-tech military thrillers. Fictional spies would tote hand-held units that precisely displayed their locations (or that of their objectives) anywhere on earth - with street maps and 3D topographic representations to boot! Reality imitates artShow full article

Driving Through Trees: Using GPSy

Karen Nakamura, who wrote the GPS overview article in this issue, contacted TidBITS with an interesting proposition: Would we be interested in testing some GPS units in tandem with her software, GPSy? Although none of us on staff have a good reason to use a GPS unit in the near future, we were tantalized by three factors: the futuristic ability to pinpoint one's position on Earth using orbiting satellites, the fact that Karen offered to write an article about a subject that interested us, and the chance to play with cool toys. Preparing to Race Satellites -- Karen shipped us a copy of GPSy and DeLorme's Street Atlas 3.0, along with two GPS units, a Garmin GPS 12XL and a DeLorme TripMateShow full article

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