Thoughtful, detailed coverage of the Mac, iPhone, and iPad, plus the best-selling Take Control ebooks.

 

 

Pick an apple! 
 
Fixing Save as Adobe PDF Crashes

There have been many reported instances of the "Save as Adobe PDF" workflow crashing regardless of application, but precious few workarounds or resolutions. In troubleshooting, I discovered that there were three instances of the "Save as Adobe PDF.action" in three different locations: /Library/Automator; ~/Library/Automator; and /System/Library/Automator. By eliminating all except the version in /System/Library/Automator, the workflow started behaving, and I was able to cut PDFs directly from the Print dialog.

Submitted by
John Zielinski

 

 

Other articles in the series ADB Restart Devices

 

 
Previous: TidBITS 438 Next: TidBITS 440

Apple Racks Up $101 Million Profit

Apple Racks Up $101 Million Profit -- Apple Computer last week announced a profit of $101 million for the third fiscal quarter of 1998, although bolstered by $26 million in one-time investment gainsShow full article

OLE Security Patch for Mac Office 98

OLE Security Patch for Mac Office 98 -- Microsoft Corporation has released an OLE update for English language versions of Microsoft Office 98 designed to prevent OLE applications from storing extraneous data - possibly including email, financial data, or other sensitive information - within document filesShow full article

Free RAM Doubler 8 Update

Free RAM Doubler 8 Update -- Users of Connectix's RAM Doubler 2.x can now update to RAM Doubler 8 using a free updater (379K download) available from Connectix's Web siteShow full article

Maxum Moves to Plug NetCloak Security Hole

Maxum Moves to Plug NetCloak Security Hole -- Maxum Development has released an interim "final candidate" version of NetCloak 2.5.4, its server-side tool for creating dynamic Web contentShow full article

Griffin iMates USB and ADB

Griffin iMates USB and ADB -- Griffin Technology last week announced the iMate, a $29 USB-to-ADB adapter that enables iMac users to use standard ADB devices such as keyboards, mice, trackballs, and joysticksShow full article

Keep It Up More Often

Keep It Up More Often -- Karl Pottie has released Keep It Up 1.4.1, a minor bug fix for his useful application monitoring utility. Keep It Up watches selected applications and relaunches them if they quit or crashShow full article

AutoShare 2.4 Released

AutoShare 2.4 Released -- Mikael Hansen has released AutoShare 2.4, his freeware mailing list server and auto-responder. New in version 2.4 are several additional process extender types, a sample process extender for vacation mail, enhancements to the automatic bounce processing module, plus minor improvements and bug fixesShow full article

Tenon Revs Up WebTen 2.1

Tenon Revs Up WebTen 2.1 -- Last week, Tenon Intersystems released WebTen 2.1, a high-performance, Apache-based, Macintosh Web server, which also includes DNS, multihoming FTP, NFS, and SSL 3.0Show full article

Disk Copy 6.3 Adds and Improves Features

Disk Copy 6.3 Adds and Improves Features -- Apple has released Disk Copy 6.3, a free program for creating and manipulating disk image files, including the New Disk Image Format (NDIF) archives that Apple uses for software updatesShow full article

Newer Present at Macworld

Newer Present at Macworld -- Oops. We biffed it in TidBITS-438 when we said that Newer Technology wasn't present at Macworld. In fact, Newer Technology was sharing a booth with NewerRAM, which is now owned by Peripheral Enhancements CorporationShow full article

TidBITS Sues Spammer

[This article is currently unavailable.] Show full article

Closing the Book on Visual Page

Normally in TidBITS we try to be calm and well-reasoned, but every now and then, we hear about a move so stupid that it makes our stomachs hurt. That's happened recently at Symantec (motto: "If you can't beat the competition, buy them and kill their product") with their highly regarded HTML authoring tool Visual PageShow full article

The Battle of the Bouncers, Part 1

I run a number of Macintosh-based Internet servers, and for the most part, these servers are stable. Crashes aren't frequent, but they do happen often enough to be a nuisance, particularly on Web servers that need to run all the timeShow full article

Show the full text of all articles