Thoughtful, detailed coverage of the Mac, iPhone, and iPad, plus the best-selling Take Control ebooks.

 

 

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Spin Through Toolbar View Options

Although many people never change their toolbars from the default settings, all standard toolbars on the Mac offer six states: icon only, text only, and icon and text, with all three coming in normal and small size. You can change them by choosing View > Customize Toolbar.

But there's a shortcut that makes it easier to check out each variant. Simply Command-click the toolbar lozenge at the upper right of a window, and the toolbar switches to the next view. Click it enough times, and you cycle back to the start.

 
 
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Microsoft Releases Windows XP

Microsoft Releases Windows XP -- Microsoft last week released Windows XP, the first version of the Windows operating system that melds the industrial-strength underpinnings of the Windows NT/2000 line with the more consumer friendly features and interface of the Windows 95/98/Me lineShow full article

IPNetSentry 1.3 Goes Beyond Personal Use

IPNetSentry 1.3 Goes Beyond Personal Use -- Sustainable Softworks has released IPNetSentry 1.3, the latest version of their personal firewall and intrusion detection software (see "Macworld SF 2001 Trend: Personal Firewalls" in TidBITS-564 for more information on personal firewalls)Show full article

iPod Makes Music More Attractive

In the promotional video Apple created for its new audio player, Apple Vice President of Industrial Design Jonathan Ive says, "Our goal was to design the very very best MP3 player we could." Looking at the iPod, it's obvious that they've succeeded - but at $400 a pop, the big question is whether the iPod will turn into a success story like the iMac or a painful lesson like the G4 Cube. Open the iPod Bay Doors, HAL -- The iPod is a stainless steel, 6.5 ounce portable music playerShow full article

Steal This Essay 2: Why Encryption Doesn't Help

"Doveriai no proveriai." (Trust but verify.) - Russian proverb, as quoted by Ronald Reagan Even as content becomes a public good, content creators (or at least the publishing and recording industries that claim to represent them) have been led to believe that encryption can protect their revenue streamsShow full article

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