Thoughtful, detailed coverage of the Mac, iPhone, and iPad, plus the best-selling Take Control ebooks.

 

 

Pick an apple! 
 
Copy Disk Image as Folder

When you open a .dmg file, a disk image is mounted. You are then generally supposed to copy the contents of that disk image to your hard drive (to your Desktop, your Applications folder, or wherever). But what if you want to copy the whole disk image, including all its contents, as a folder? Hold the Option key, and drag the "proxy icon" in the title bar of the disk image window to the destination in the Finder.

Submitted by
Matt Neuburg

 

 

Other articles in the series Breeds of Programs

 

 
Previous: TidBITS 614 Next: TidBITS 616

BBEdit 6.5.2 Tweaks Features, Fixes Bugs

BBEdit 6.5.2 Tweaks Features, Fixes Bugs -- Bare Bones Software has released BBEdit 6.5.2, a minor update to their powerful text and HTML editor. New features include better reporting of search errors, improved HTML syntax checking, type-to-select in hierarchical lists, commenting in CSS files, and a few slightly tweaked Aqua interface controlsShow full article

Snapz Pro X 1.0.2 Fixes Several Bugs

Snapz Pro X 1.0.2 Fixes Several Bugs -- For those needing to take screenshots in Mac OS X, the only serious tool available is Ambrosia Software's Snapz Pro X, which provides the functions most people need, such as saving in multiple formats, being able to select on-screen objects easily, naming screenshot files automatically, and saving to user-specified locationsShow full article

IBM's Chatty Revolution - ViaVoice for Mac OS X

The goal of a continuous speech recognition program is to let you dictate what your computer should type. In December 1999, when IBM shipped the first Mac version of such a program, the sound from most users wasn't dictation but a groanShow full article

Dipping into Digital Video

Here at TidBITS, we try to stay in step with the latest hardware and software being released for the Mac, such as our recent post-keynote look at iPhoto and the new flat-panel iMacShow full article

Mac OS X: Breeds of Programs, Part 2

In the previous installment of this article we looked at three of the five breeds of programs that run in Mac OS X: Classic, Carbon, and Cocoa. Those three are most notable because they're used for the majority of current Mac OS X programsShow full article

Show the full text of all articles