Thoughtful, detailed coverage of the Mac, iPhone, and iPad, plus the best-selling Take Control ebooks.



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Open Files with Finder's App Switcher

Say you're in the Finder looking at a file and you want to open it with an application that's already running but which doesn't own that particular document. How? Switch to that app and choose File > Open? Too many steps. Choose Open With from the file's contextual menu? Takes too long, and the app might not be listed. Drag the file to the Dock and drop it onto the app's icon? The icon might be hard to find; worse, you might miss.

In Leopard there's a new solution: use the Command-Tab switcher. Yes, the Command-Tab switcher accepts drag-and-drop! The gesture required is a bit tricky. Start dragging the file in the Finder: move the file, but don't let up on the mouse button. With your other hand, press Command-Tab to summon the switcher, and don't let up on the Command key. Drag the file onto the application's icon in the switcher and let go of the mouse. (Now you can let go of the Command key too.) Extra tip: If you switch to the app beforehand, its icon in the Command-Tab switcher will be easy to find; it will be first (or second).

Visit Take Control of Customizing Leopard

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NoteBook 2.1 Adds Syncing, Cornell Note-Taking System

NoteBook 2.1 Adds Syncing, Cornell Note-Taking System -- Circus Ponies Software has released NoteBook 2.1, a notable (heh!) upgrade to their information organizing tool (see "The Well Worn NoteBook" and "The Shiny New NoteBook" for my reviews of earlier versions)Show full article

DealBITS Drawing: BeLight Software's Image Tricks

Speaking as someone who finds Adobe Photoshop rather inscrutable while at the same time wishing I could perform some of the graphical manipulations it makes possible, I'm a total sucker for programs like BeLight Software's Image TricksShow full article

Adam & Tonya Engst Honored in MacTech 25

Due no doubt in part to the votes cast by TidBITS and Take Control readers, we were pleased to see that not just Adam, but also Tonya, were included in the MacTech 25 list of influential people in the Macintosh technical communityShow full article

Boinx's Visible Cursor Gets Slicker

As someone who gives a lot of talks with a computer as a visual aid - not "slide" presentations with Keynote or PowerPoint, but live demonstrations, where I'm doing and discussing something on my computer, whose monitor is projected onto a screen at the front of the room - I am ever cognizant of the need to optimize the audience's viewing experienceShow full article

Print-on-Demand Available for Running Windows Ebook

At last! Ever since we started Take Control in 2003, people have been taking our heavily linked and thoroughly digital ebooks and, well, printing themShow full article

Simple iPod/Auto Integration

When it comes to listening to an iPod, I find I'm interested in doing so only in very specific situations. There's an iPod in the bedroom, which helps Tonya and me go to sleep at night and wakes us up in the morning, and I've become quite fond of listening to the iPod's earbuds inside protective earphones while mowing the lawnShow full article

Take Control News/17-Jul-06

Backups Ebook Updated to Cover Intel Macs and More -- Need a rock-solid, up-to-date backup strategy to protect your important data? Turn to version 1.3 of Joe Kissell's popular Take Control of Mac OS X Backups, which now extends its detailed discussion of different backup strategies, media, and software, along with over 20 pages of step-by-step directions for the popular Retrospect backup programShow full article

Hot Topics in TidBITS Talk/17-Jul-06

The first link for each thread description points to the traditional TidBITS Talk interface; the second link points to the same discussion on our Web Crossing server, which provides a different look and which may be faster. Erasing data on a "dead" drive -- When faced with a dead hard drive, how do you ensure that your sensitive data isn't compromised when sending the drive back for repair? Readers suggest several alternatives, from physically destroying the hard disk to swapping enclosures to determine the cause of the problemShow full article

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