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Is it a Unicode Font?

To determine if your font is Unicode-compliant, with all its characters coded and mapped correctly, choose the Font in any program (or in Font Book, set the preview area to Custom (Preview > Custom), and type Option-Shift-2.

If you get a euro character (a sort of uppercase C with two horizontal lines through its midsection), it's 99.9 percent certain the font is Unicode-compliant. If you get a graphic character that's gray rounded-rectangle frame with a euro character inside it, the font is definitely not Unicode-compliant. (The fact that the image has a euro sign in it is only coincidental: it's the image used for any missing currency sign.)

This assumes that you're using U.S. input keyboard, which is a little ironic when the euro symbol is the test. With the British keyboard, for instance, Option-2 produces the euro symbol if it's part of the font.

Visit Take Control of Fonts in Leopard

Submitted by
Sharon Zardetto

 
 
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MODE32 Refunds

This is important! The refund for MODE32 from Apple ends on 31-Dec-91, so if you haven't sent in for your $100 refund, you should send your original disk to Apple at the following addressShow full article

Microsoft Publishes Wrong 800-number

In the "Oops" department this week, we've heard that Microsoft sent out a letter about upgrading Word to a bunch of customers. This letter listed an 800 number that people could call, but the number listed goes to a consultant who's a tad displeased to be receiving a lot of calls from Word users, especially since he pays for every callShow full article

TidBITS Schedule

As many of you who have been reading TidBITS for some time know, we've been working on some heavy-duty vaporware - the promised new format. I hate making the same excuses over and over again, so I've decided to set the record straight. TidBITS-100, which will be the first issue of 1992, will be issued in the new structure enhanced text format (called "setext," but if anyone has a better suggestion let us know)Show full article

School Software

I'm a high school teacher in Cortland, N.Y. One of the things I use my Mac for is to help me do my grading, and to help me prepare things for class. Two programs my school has bought upon my recommendation are Grade Machine, by Misty City Software, and CrossMaster, by Focus Development CorpShow full article

SFDialogers Followup

Mark Nagata commented on our recent SFDIaloger comparison (in TidBITS-093). He mentioned that some utilities, at least the CEToolbox/DiskTop combination and Suitcase II (for DA launching) remember the last folder used and put you in that folder no matter where the application or DA launched may resideShow full article

Nisus, MacWrite II, and XTND

Povl H. Pedersen writes: "You can make your copy of Nisus read MacWrite II files (I can even read DOS WordPerfect 5.0 files and a lot more). If you keep the option key pressed while selecting Open..Show full article

SCSI Plugging

The indefatigable Murph Sewall passed on these bits of information about connecting SCSI devices when the power is on (don't do it!). In response to my question about the risk of connecting or disconnecting a SCSI device without bothering to shut down, one person says they've done it from time to time and had a fuse blow once, possibly as a consequenceShow full article

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