Thoughtful, detailed coverage of the Mac, iPhone, and iPad, plus the best-selling Take Control ebooks.

 

 

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Improve Apple Services with AirPort Base Stations

You can make iChat file transfers, iDisk, and Back to My Mac work better by turning on a setting with Apple AirPort base stations released starting in 2003. Launch AirPort Utility, select your base station, click Manual Setup, choose the Internet view, and click the NAT tab. Check the Enable NAT Port Mapping Protocol (NAT-PMP) box, and click Update. NAT-PMP lets your Mac OS X computer give Apple information to connect back into a network that's otherwise unreachable from the rest of the Internet. This speeds updates and makes connections work better for services run by Apple.

 
 

Article 1 of 9 in series

The User Over Your Shoulder - Of Macs and Macros

TidBITS not long ago discussed three macro programs: QuicKeys (beginning in TidBITS-347), OneClick (in TidBITS-350), and KeyQuencer (in TidBITS-351.) Consideration of these has led me to some reflections on the state of the MacShow full article

Article 2 of 9 in series

Form, Function, and QuicKeys 3.5, Part 1

"The question is," said Humpty Dumpty, "which is to be master - that's all."     - Lewis Carroll Perfecting the relationship between form and function is no easy thing for a software developerShow full article

Article 3 of 9 in series

Form, Function, and QuicKeys 3.5, Part 2

Last week in TidBITS-347, the first part of this article described CE Software's QuicKeys (QK) and mentioned a new feature of the recent 3.5 release: toolbar triggersShow full article

Article 4 of 9 in series

OneClick - A Super Utility

Late last year, WestCode Software introduced OneClick, their answer to the need for a flexible, easy-to-use, comprehensive, highly customizable utility programShow full article

Article 5 of 9 in series

KeyQuencer - QuicKeys Quencher?

Those wishing to automate their Macs without spending the money or yielding the RAM required to run one of the big commercial macro programs may wish to consider KeyQuencerShow full article

Article 6 of 9 in series

QuicKeys 4 Presses My Buttons

Back in 1988, when Microsoft Word couldn't search and replace styles, a Classics student of mine named Adam Engst (what ever became of him?) put me wise to a solution involving macro automation, using CE Software's QuicKeysShow full article

Article 7 of 9 in series

Freedom of the Button Press - OneClick 2.0

In the struggle to return control of the computer to the user, macro utilities are indispensable. Such a utility acts as a ghostly simulacrum of a live user, choosing from menus, typing keys, and clicking the mouse; an assemblage of such actions can essentially script the unscriptable, driving any application to customize or automate frequent or repetitive tasksShow full article

Article 8 of 9 in series

QuicKeys X: The Return of the Ghost

With the advent of Mac OS X 10.1, I'm using Mac OS X nearly all the time, but many of my long-standing work habits have become useless. That's because those habits rely on third-party utilities that haven't made the transition - and, one fears, may never do soShow full article

Article 9 of 9 in series

Scripting the Unscriptable in Mac OS X

This is the tale of a U.S. government statute, a certain Cupertino-based computer company, and a small revolution taking place quietly on your computer, if you use Mac OS X 10.2 Jaguar. To understand this revolution, you need to know what a macro program isShow full article

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