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Syslogd Overwhelming Your Computer?

If your Leopard (Mac OS X 10.5) system is unexpectedly sluggish, logging might be the culprit. Run Activity Monitor (Applications/Utilities/ folder), and click the CPU column twice to get it to show most to least activity. If syslogd is at the top of the list, there's a fix. Syslogd tracks informational messages produced by software and writes them to the asl.db, a file in your Unix /var/log/ directory. It's a known problem that syslogd can run amok. There's a fix: deleting the asl.db file.

Launch Terminal (from the same Utilities folder), and enter these commands exactly as written, entering your administrative password when prompted:

sudo launchctl stop com.apple.syslogd

sudo rm /var/log/asl.db

sudo launchctl start com.apple.syslogd

Your system should settle down to normal. For more information, follow the link.

Visit Discussion of syslogd problem at Smarticus

 
 

Article 1 of 2 in series

The Battle of the Bouncers, Part 1

I run a number of Macintosh-based Internet servers, and for the most part, these servers are stable. Crashes aren't frequent, but they do happen often enough to be a nuisance, particularly on Web servers that need to run all the timeShow full article

Article 2 of 2 in series

The Battle of the Bouncers, Part 2

In the first part of this article in TidBITS-439, I looked at how three crash detection devices - the PowerKey Pro, Rebound, and Lazarus - compare in terms of hardware, restart method, and crash detection capabilitiesShow full article

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