Thoughtful, detailed coverage of the Mac, iPhone, and iPad, plus the best-selling Take Control ebooks.



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Find Next Without Using the Find Dialog in Word 2008

Rarely do you want to find just one instance of a word or phrase in Word. Instead of trying to keep Word 2008's Find and Replace dialog showing while searching, which can be awkward on a small screen, try the Next Find control. After you've found the term you're looking for once, click the downward-pointing double arrow button at the bottom of the vertical scroll bar to find the next instance of your search term. The upward-pointing double arrow finds the previous instance, which is way easier than switching to Current Document Up in the expanded Find and Replace dialog.


Article 1 of 5 in series

BookBITS: Mac OS 9: The Missing Manual

In 1990, I bought my first Macintosh, a PowerBook 100 that included a whopping 2 MB of RAM, a 20 MB hard disk, and System 7. As a new computer user, I was amazed at how easy it was to use, and, especially, how simple and clear it was to manage the system software. Those days have changedShow full article

Article 2 of 5 in series

BookBITS: Telling the Bits from the Bytes

The speed of technology engenders not only growth in computer performance, but also in the number of words we use to talk about it. Computer terminology may not approach the doubling in chip performance that occurs every 18 months according to Moore's Law, but it can feel like that at timesShow full article

Article 3 of 5 in series

BookBITS: The Mac OS 9 Bible

Computer books can be big, because computers - as well as the applications and operating systems they use - are far more complex than their makers would often like to admitShow full article

Article 4 of 5 in series

BookBITS: Me, My iMac and I - Three Books for iMac Users

Last week, Apple announced that it had sold its five millionth iMac, making the translucent machine Apple's best-selling Macintosh model of all time. Its unique design attracted many who had never before purchased computers, and its ubiquitous shape and colors have made it almost standard fare in mainstream magazine photo spreads, television shows, and movies - when you need to show a computer, you might as well present one that looks good. Many TidBITS readers undoubtedly own iMacs, as I do, and many of you may also have family members who own oneShow full article

Article 5 of 5 in series

Two Books on Mac OS X

When I started using Mac OS X, back in the days of the public beta, I was both confused and disappointed. The habits and familiarity I had developed over more than a decade working with Macs had been tossed by the waysideShow full article

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