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Wake On Demand in Snow Leopard

Putting your Mac to sleep saves power, but it also disrupts using your Mac as a file server, among other purposes. Wake on Demand in Snow Leopard works in conjunction with an Apple base station to continue announcing Bonjour services that the sleeping computer offers.

While the requirements for this feature are complex, eligible users can toggle this feature in the Energy Saver preference pane. It's labeled Wake on Network Access for computers that can be roused either via Wi-Fi or Ethernet; Wake on Ethernet Network Access or Wake on AirPort Network Access for wired- or wireless-only machines, respectively. Uncheck the box to disable this feature.

Submitted by
Doug McLean

 
 

Article 1 of 3 in series

A Mac User's Guide to the Unix Command Line, Part 1

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Article 2 of 3 in series

A Mac User's Guide to the Unix Command Line, Part 2

Lesson 2: Navigating the File System In the first installment of this series, we looked at the basics of using the Terminal to access Mac OS X's Unix coreShow full article

Article 3 of 3 in series

A Mac User's Guide to the Unix Command Line, Part 3

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