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The Lotus Look

Lotus won its three-year old suit against Paperback Software for copying the look and feel of 123. The decision said that Paperback Software had violated Lotus's copyright, although another suit Lotus has brought against Mosaic Software for their 123 clone, Twin, was not mentioned

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Call 1-900-555-HELP?

Someone on Usenet recently asked what people thought about charging for technical support via a 900 number. The principle is that the call would not be free but the user would be guaranteed of getting through and getting an answer

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Electromagnetic Controversy

Macworld devoted much of its July, 1990 issue to the health hazards of computers. Most of the articles actually focussed on the side-effects of working at video display terminals (i.e

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HyperCard 2.0, Finally

After what seemed like forever to those of us who use HyperCard, Apple released version 2.0. We'll assume that if you are reading TidBITS, you understand more or less what HyperCard can do and how hard it is to pin down its abilities

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C Shells by the C Shore

Last week's article on Ostrakon, an application shell for THINK C, garnered a response that we feel worth mentioning this week. We said then that compiler packages often came with skeleton applications for people to flesh out, but that Ostrakon took this idea one step farther by providing extensive documentation and commented code

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SID II

Some of you may remember reading about an ambitious and generous project to create an inexpensive sound digitizer from plans and software donated to the Mac community by a group calling themselves The SID Trio

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Reverse Engineers

Faced with the contradictory news of the new low-cost Mac (MacCheap?), a number of people on Usenet have started talking about the possibilities of reverse engineering the Mac ROMs along with the rest of the Mac hardware

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Wanted: Color SE

This is yet another article inspired by discussions of the low-cost Mac and what it should be. We may even write an article on the low-cost Mac itself one of these days, although a few more facts and a bit less rumor will be necessary first

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Yet More Compression

Compression is an excellent way to save space and is more elegant than using larger and larger hard disks or faster methods of data transmission. MIT's Media Lab does a great deal of work on newer and more efficient methods of compression for this very reason

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The Art of the Interface

We've stuck to software reviews so far in TidBITS, but a new book has recently come to our attention that may merit a review once we've found and read it

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HyperGoodies

HyperCard may be a commercial failure, but it certainly hasn't failed to generate a myriad of add-ons. Although stacks are seldom sold outright, utilities for creating stacks are quite popular

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Ostrakon

Programming on the Mac has been long bemoaned as a hard task because of the difficulty involved in programming the interface itself. It is much harder to write a graphical interface than it is to work with a command line, something that many IBM-clone programmers are discovering with Windows 3.0

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NFS on the Mac

As the high end Macs approach the low end workstations (which in turn are dropping quickly in price), methods of connecting the two become more necessary

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The View from the L

You've all heard of the Radius Pivot and the PCPC Flipper in previous issues of TidBITS. Well, another monitor has arrived on the scene for those of you interested in modifying your view on the computer's world

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PatchMaker

If you have ever had to upgrade an entire office full of software, you know what a pain it can be. Some offices don't upgrade as often as possible because of the trouble involved in upgrading each computer relatively often