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Adam Engst No comments

Installation

MacInTax comes on two disks and requires that you use its installation program to copy the files to your hard disk. The installer program is a special version of StuffIt (but not StuffIt Deluxe) and it isn't terribly capable - all it does is ask you which folder to copy the files to

Adam Engst No comments

The Dirty Work

When you start up the program for the first time, it searches for all the forms (which it does on each startup - kind of irritating) and then displays a window explaining the difference between the various 1040 forms (1040, 1040A, 1040EZ, 1040X for amended tax returns, and 1040-ES for estimated taxes) so you can figure out which one to file

Adam Engst No comments

Converting & Printing

So what's left? The numbers that you enter into your tax forms come from a number of different sources, and MacInTax doesn't help a great deal here, although it will let you import data from other applications (the manual doesn't say which ones are supported) and from text files

Adam Engst No comments

Help!

This is probably the most common word associated with tax preparation, and although MacInTax does a good basic job at helping you fill out the forms, it doesn't do much more

Adam Engst No comments

Documentation

The MacInTax manual is good, but not great. There is an introduction, eight chapters, seven appendixes, and an index. The introduction is just that, and the first two chapters walk you through installation and basic usage

Adam Engst No comments

Conclusion

If you still do your taxes by hand with your Macintosh turned off on the desk in front of you, buy MacInTax. If you call MacConnection before 3:15 AM, you can go to sleep and they'll have it at your door the next day so you can save an incredible amount of time in preparing the stupid tax return

Adam Engst No comments

MailBITS/18-Mar-91

Some people have suggested that we start a regular letters section, so we've decided that a quasi-sporadic, semi-edited section does make sense. Some mailfiles will come through complete; others we'll edit for space reasons

Adam Engst No comments

Input Devices, Newer and Weirder

Cool new input devices are always a hard call - on the one hand you want companies to challenge the status quo and come out with the ultimate in control, but on the other hand, if an input device is too strange looking, no one will even think of buying it

Adam Engst No comments

Apple Bargain Basement

A lot of people had to quiet down when Apple introduced the Classic, LC, and IIsi because those machines aren't priced to compete with workstations. They are quite affordable (though it's still easy to find PC users bellyaching about how expensive Macs are), and Apple has lowered prices on a number of other machines to spread the savings across the product line. New Suggested Retail Price Reduction Mac IIfx 4/floppy $7,369 $1,600 Mac IIfx 4/80HD $8,069 $1,800 Mac IIfx 4/160HD $8,669 $2,300 Mac IIci 4/floppy $5,269 $700 Mac IIci 4/80HD $5,969 $700 Mac SE/30 4/40HD $3,369 $1000 Mac SE/30 4/80HD $3,869 $1700 Personal LaserWriter NT $2,599 $700 LaserWriter II NT $3,999

Ian Feldman No comments

Learn Unix the Easy Way

Undoubtedly many reviewers have heralded the epic and factual qualities of Cliff Stoll's book "The Cuckoo's Egg." Indeed, his account of how he first discovered and then dealt with an anonymous intruder in the computer system that he managed is a potent read, and I found it difficult to lay down the book to attend to everyday chores

Adam Engst No comments

Apple’s New Printers

People looking to purchase low-cost Macintosh printers now have better options than ever before. Today, Apple introduced the StyleWriter, a 360 dpi inkjet printer and the LaserWriter LS, a QuickDraw laser printer

Adam Engst No comments

Compression Field Expands

Just after we finish a special issue comparing the major compression programs (thanks, Ken!), the industry burps and spits out another few entrants. The compression market started with Pack-It, then StuffIt, and then StuffIt Deluxe and Compact Pro and DiskDoubler and Diamond, and now up pop the shareware AutoSqueeze, the DoubleUp board from Sigma Designs, the Gold Card from Pinnacle Micro, and SuperDisk! from Alysis Software. You've heard about the main programs and the DoubleUp board already, so I'll restrict myself to the new stuff

Adam Engst No comments

Single Purpose Printer

Some people try to make their printers capable of handling every sort of paper size and type, including envelopes. But those envelopes have always been the catch (literally, if you feed them through a finicky laser printer)

Adam Engst No comments

Apple 1, Microsoft 0

Apple has won round one of the lawsuit between Apple and Microsoft (and HP, to be technically correct). In a decision last week, Judge Vaughn Walker of the U.S

Adam Engst No comments

Unicode

I don't know how many of you have had the opportunity to view some of the extended ASCII characters on PC-clones, but they are pretty funny. You find little smiley-faces, all the suits in a deck of cards, and lots of other fun characters