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Adam Engst No comments

HyperGoodies

HyperCard may be a commercial failure, but it certainly hasn't failed to generate a myriad of add-ons. Although stacks are seldom sold outright, utilities for creating stacks are quite popular

Adam Engst No comments

Ostrakon

Programming on the Mac has been long bemoaned as a hard task because of the difficulty involved in programming the interface itself. It is much harder to write a graphical interface than it is to work with a command line, something that many IBM-clone programmers are discovering with Windows 3.0

Adam Engst No comments

NFS on the Mac

As the high end Macs approach the low end workstations (which in turn are dropping quickly in price), methods of connecting the two become more necessary

Adam Engst No comments

The View from the L

You've all heard of the Radius Pivot and the PCPC Flipper in previous issues of TidBITS. Well, another monitor has arrived on the scene for those of you interested in modifying your view on the computer's world

Adam Engst No comments

PatchMaker

If you have ever had to upgrade an entire office full of software, you know what a pain it can be. Some offices don't upgrade as often as possible because of the trouble involved in upgrading each computer relatively often

Adam Engst No comments

Bookend Indexer

The ultimate horror for a desktop publisher using PageMaker 3.0 is the end of the year index for a series of newsletters. In most cases, embedded graphics and the design of the newsletter make it impossible to use a word processor to generate the index (if the original word processor can generate indices at all)

Adam Engst No comments

Macworld Expo Info

[Editors' Note: This information comes to you verbatim from Mitch Hall & Associates, the organizers of Macworld Expo.] SHOW DATES Wednesday, August 8 - Saturday, August 11, 1990 LOCATIONS Bayside Expo Center, 200 Mt

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MacAdemia Nuts

Higher education met the Mac several weeks ago at the fifth annual Apple-sponsored MacAdemia conference. Some 800 educators and Macintosh enthusiasts gathered in Rochester, New York (USA) to view a variety of Macintosh demonstrations with an emphasis on the Mac in education

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PostScript Alternatives

Last summer, Hewlett-Packard made an aggressive entry into the Macintosh printer market with its DeskWriter, a 300 dpi inkjet printer. As a substitute for the ImageWriter or as a compromise between a dot matrix and a laser printer, the DeskWriter works well

Adam Engst No comments

Farallon Voice Digitizer

Last week Farallon began shipping a voice digitizer that should make voice mail and voice additions to files an easy reality. Farallon's new product, the MacRecorder Voice Digitizer, can be used to input voice messages to many Macintosh electronic mail systems, including QuickMail 2.2x from CE Software, Microsoft Mail 2.0, and WordPerfect Office Mail. The new Voice Digitizer does not come with sound editing software and is targeted to people who wish to add simple sounds or voice to a Macintosh file

Adam Engst No comments

Recharge or Recycle?

Computers are fairly good about not using natural resources and not creating unnecessary waste products. In fact, one of the design features in our original conception of TidBITS was that it would never generate waste paper

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Editors’ Notes

We currently face a dilemma with TidBITS. We have found alternative sources of information so we no longer rely on the trade magazines much at all any more

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Color PostScript Printers

Color PostScript printers still cost more than their speedier monochrome counterparts, but now that they list for under $8,000, they should become more widely available

Adam Engst No comments

CompuServe Censoring

Several people on Usenet report that CompuServe has killed its National Bulletin Board service as of June 1st, 1990. In its place is a new bulletin board service that charges $1.00 per line

Timothy E. Forsyth No comments

Robert Noyce Dies

Robert Noyce, one of the inventors of the integrated circuit, died recently of a heart attack at age 62. In 1959 he was awarded a patent for his work in connecting a number of transistors on a single silicon chip, the first of the integrated circuits that are now responsible for the $500 billion electronics industry. Noyce founded Intel, but his influence was also distributed to the political aspects of the industry, and he spent much time in Washington lobbying on behalf of the industry