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Enabling Auto Spelling Correction in Snow Leopard

In Snow Leopard, the automatic spelling correction in applications is not usually activated by default. To turn it on, make sure the cursor's insertion point is somewhere where text can be entered, and either choose Edit > Spelling and Grammar > Correct Spelling Automatically or, if the Edit menu's submenu doesn't have what you need, Control-click where you're typing and choose Spelling and Grammar > Correct Spelling Automatically from the contextual menu that appears. The latter approach is particularly likely to be necessary in Safari and other WebKit-based applications, like Mailplane.

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Doug McLean

 
 

Consultant Training at MacTech Boot Camp and Macworld Expo

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Before I started TidBITS in 1990, I was working as an independent Mac consultant. I was fresh out of Cornell and my College Scholar degree in Hypertextual Fiction (with a major in Classics!) had done squat for teaching me how to run a consulting business and work with clients. I managed acceptably for a couple of years until we moved to Seattle in 1991, when I decided I’d have better luck focusing on TidBITS than building a consulting practice in a city where I knew no one.

What I wish I’d had back then, though, was the upcoming MacTech Boot Camp, a one-day conference that takes place the day before (but is unaffiliated with) Macworld Expo. If you’re already planning to attend Macworld Expo, which is extremely useful for consultants as well, thanks to the access to vendors on the show floor and the essential MacIT technical sessions, MacTech Boot Camp offers the sort of training you won’t find anywhere else on the day before Macworld Expo’s show floor opens (that’s Wednesday, 26 January 2011).

MacTech Boot Camp sessions include topics on building your brand, working with clients, best practices for hardware and software deployment for consultants, making remote consulting work, and finding the support resources that you need as a consultant. Some of the content is technical, but what’s more important is that all of it is focused on the job of being a consultant or support professional. I don’t know all the presenters, but I was pleased to recognize a few names, including Ivan Drucker and Caroline Green from New York City, to whom I’ve referred people on a few occasions when the situation required on-site assistance.

MacTech Boot Camp will take place on 26 January 2011, from 9 AM through 6 PM, at the Parc 55 Hotel in San Francisco. Pre-registration costs $395 through 18 January 2011, or $495 after that; lunch is included. There’s also a study session and exam for becoming Apple Certified on the day before MacTech Boot Camp (Tuesday, 25 January 2011); it costs an additional $199. Educational pricing is available for students.

And if you haven’t already signed up for Macworld Expo itself, you can use this link to get a $15 expo pass for the show floor, or, even better, 10 percent off conference passes.

 

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Air Display 2 lets you use your iPad, iPhone, or nearby Mac as
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Comments about Consultant Training at MacTech Boot Camp and Macworld Expo

Jeff Porten  An apple icon for a Friend of TidBITS 2011-01-14 15:34
A Cornell degree was useless for your business? I am shocked, shocked!

(Says the guy with an American Civilization degree from Penn....)
Adam Engst  An apple icon for a TidBITS Staffer 2011-01-14 15:49
Sad but true! Actually, that's not quite true - I learned how to think and how to formulate arguments thanks to professors like Carl Sagan, Gail Fine, and Matt Neuburg (yes, that Matt Neuburg).

But on the business side, not so much...