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Category: Networking

Adam Engst 8 comments

Xmarks Bookmark-Syncing Service Shuts Down

The Xmarks bookmark-syncing service shut down on 1 May 2018—with users receiving little warning. Looks like there never really was a business model behind cross-browser and platform bookmark syncing.

Josh Centers No comments

Twitter App Developers Band Together to Fight API Changes

Upcoming Twitter API changes will severely cripple third-party client apps. The developers of some of those apps are banding together to pressure Twitter into changing things before the August deadline.

Julio Ojeda-Zapata 27 comments

Google Revamps Gmail’s Web Interface

Gmail, Google’s popular email service, has undergone a revamp that includes visual tweaks and a battery of new features, some focused on usability, others on security.

Josh Centers 81 comments

RIP: Apple AirPort, 1999–2018

Long a mainstay of wireless networking for Mac users, Apple’s line of Wi-Fi routers — the AirPort Extreme, AirPort Express, and AirPort Time Capsule — have been officially discontinued.

Josh Centers 19 comments

SmugMug Buys Flickr from the Remains of Yahoo

Photo-sharing service SmugMug has purchased the beloved photo service Flickr from Verizon for an undisclosed sum.

Glenn Fleishman 18 comments

Cloudflare and Quad9 Aim to Improve DNS

The domain name system is largely insecure, leaking information and subject to compromise. New services from Cloudflare and Quad9 could provide greater security and integrity than Google Public DNS, currently the best known public DNS service.

Josh Centers 1 comment

Google Chrome 66 Promises to Mute Auto-Play Videos

Google has added a feature to its Google Chrome Web browser that the company promises will reduce the annoyance of auto-play videos, but there are exceptions that may make it less useful.

Adam Engst 12 comments

Google Sunsets goo.gl URL Shortener

Google has announced that no new users will be able to use the goo.gl URL shortening service after 13 April 2018, and existing users will lose access on 30 March 2019. Shortened links will redirect indefinitely.

Geoff Duncan 2 comments

Can U.S. States Hang on to Net Neutrality?

Now that the FCC has gutted federal net neutrality regulations, can individual states put up enough of a fight to preserve some sort of net neutrality — and maybe consumer privacy?

Josh Centers 2 comments

Why Google Fiber Failed to Fix Broadband

In 2010, Google shook the tech world by announcing that it would get into the ISP business with Google Fiber, deploying gigabit fiber-optic Internet connections in what would become nine metro areas around the United States. Now Google has put the ambitious project on an indefinite “pause” and is even pulling out of Boston. You can likely guess the reasons why Google Fiber has struggled: local politics and the difficulty of installing real-world infrastructure. Despite its challenges, Google Fiber has had a positive effect on the Internet market in the United States by generating discussion about broadband competition. Plus, in markets with Google Fiber, broadband prices have dropped and service speeds have improved radically.

Julio Ojeda-Zapata 6 comments

Three Alternatives to Twitter’s Now-Defunct Mac App

Twitter is finally putting its long-stagnant Mac app out of its misery. Now users must find replacements. Sadly, the selection isn’t vast. Julio Ojeda-Zapata tested two native Mac apps, Twitterrific and Tweetbot, along with Twitter’s own cross-platform TweetDeck, which is intended for power users.

Glenn Fleishman 3 comments

WPA3 Promises Better Wi-Fi Security with Less Effort

The Wi-Fi Alliance has announced WPA3, a replacement for its current local network encryption options. WPA3 both fixes an exploit and increases security for those using open networks, all while reducing the burden on users. But don’t expect it to take over from WPA2 soon.

Adam Engst 4 comments

FCC Votes to Abolish Net Neutrality

It should come as no surprise that Ajit Pai’s FCC has voted to eliminate Obama-era net neutrality rules that prevented Internet service providers from blocking, throttling, or prioritizing Internet traffic, among much else. At Ars Technica, Jon Brodkin outlines what happened, how we got here, and what comes next. Given the overwhelming and bipartisan support for net neutrality from most Americans, the FCC’s move will likely draw challenges both in the courts and in Congress.

Geoff Duncan 16 comments

FCC to End Net Neutrality

The FCC is set to rescind Obama-era regulations that mandate net neutrality — and what happens next is anybody’s guess.

Josh Centers 1 comment

Inventor of the Web Concerned for Its Future

Sir Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web as an “open platform that allows anyone to share information, access opportunities and collaborate across geographical boundaries,” but he’s less optimistic about its future than he used to be. “We have to grit our teeth and hang on to the fence and not take it for granted that the Web will lead us to wonderful things,” he said. In particular, Berners-Lee criticizes Web advertising for its role in creating clickbait and spreading propaganda. “The system is failing. The way ad revenue works with clickbait is not fulfilling the goal of helping humanity promote truth and democracy.”