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Is it a Unicode Font?

To determine if your font is Unicode-compliant, with all its characters coded and mapped correctly, choose the Font in any program (or in Font Book, set the preview area to Custom (Preview > Custom), and type Option-Shift-2.

If you get a euro character (a sort of uppercase C with two horizontal lines through its midsection), it's 99.9 percent certain the font is Unicode-compliant. If you get a graphic character that's gray rounded-rectangle frame with a euro character inside it, the font is definitely not Unicode-compliant. (The fact that the image has a euro sign in it is only coincidental: it's the image used for any missing currency sign.)

This assumes that you're using U.S. input keyboard, which is a little ironic when the euro symbol is the test. With the British keyboard, for instance, Option-2 produces the euro symbol if it's part of the font.

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“Take Control of Your Digital Photos,” Chapter 4

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This article is a pre-release chapter in Jeff Carlson’s upcoming “Take Control of Your Digital Photos,” scheduled for public release in August 2013. Apart from the introduction, these chapters are available only to TidBITS members; see “Streamed Advice for Managing Your Digital Photos” for details.


Best Practices for Importing Photos

Moving photos from a camera or memory card to the computer seems like mere transportation: bits captured and stored in one location are copied and saved to a new location. That sounds about as exciting as bringing groceries home from the market.

But what if those groceries could assemble themselves into prepared meals by the time you delivered them to your kitchen? And what if your photos could organize themselves on the way to your hard disk by detailing what’s in each image, where it was shot, and by whom?

Your computer can do more than just shuttle files from one location to another. By taking advantage of software’s capability to assign metadata during the import stage, much of the drudgery of organizing photos is handled upfront with minimal interaction required by you.

The rest of this 3,145-word article is currently restricted to paid TidBITS members. If you’d like to support our work and become a paid member, it's an easy process and we'll throw in some additional perks.

If you are a paid TidBITS member, you can read the rest of this article by logging into your account. Clicking My Account > Login at the left. Contact us if you have problems.

Check out the Take Control ebooks that expand on the topic in this article:

Manage your burgeoning digital photo collection with ease, using time-tested tips and a custom workflow developed by digital photography expert Jeff Carlson. You'll learn how best to import photos, judge them, apply keywords and other metadata, set up smart albums, and protect your irreplaceable images whether you use iPhoto, Aperture, Lightroom, or Photoshop Elements!

 

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