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Extract Directly from Time Machine

Normally you use Time Machine to restore lost data in a file like this: within the Time Machine interface, you go back to the time the file was not yet messed up, and you restore it to replace the file you have now.

You can also elect to keep both, but the restored file takes the name and place of the current one. So, if you have made changes since the backup took place that you would like to keep, they are lost, or you have to mess around a bit to merge changes, rename files, and trash the unwanted one.

As an alternative, you can browse the Time Machine backup volume directly in the Finder like any normal disk, navigate through the chronological backup hierarchy, and find the file which contains the lost content.

Once you've found it, you can open it and the current version of the file side-by-side, and copy information from Time Machine's version of the file into the current one, without losing any content you put in it since the backup was made.

Submitted by
Eolake Stobblehouse

 
 

Airfoil Speakers Touch 3 Adds AirPlay Receiver

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[24 May 2012 update: A month after Airfoil Speakers Touch 3 became available, Apple has pulled it from the App Store without any explanation to Rogue Amoeba. -Glenn]

[6 June 2012 update: Airfoil Speakers Touch 3 is back in the App Store without the capability to act as an AirPlay receiver, though it can still receive audio from Macs and PCs. Why? Because Apple didn’t like it, that’s why. -Glenn]

Rogue Amoeba’s Airfoil has long been a nifty way to redirect audio from a Mac (and later from a Windows system) to other computers running Airfoil and the Airfoil Speakers program, as well as to AirPlay (formerly AirTunes) receivers, including the AirPort Express Base Station. Airfoil lets you decouple audio from any program and system output, and push it over a Wi-Fi or Ethernet network to where you want.

The company charges $25 for Airfoil and gives away Airfoil Speakers, which can only play audio. It introduced Airfoil Speakers Touch for iOS in 2009 as a free app to receive audio from copies of Airfoil running on the local network. Airfoil Speakers Touch 3.0 adds a native iPad interface, including Retina display graphics.

But the big news is an in-app purchase. For $2.99, Airfoil Speakers Touch users can add Enhanced Audio Receiving, the capability to act like an AirPlay receiver. Any iOS device, as well as iTunes on Mac and Windows, can recognize an Airfoil Speakers Touch-running iOS device on the same local Wi-Fi network as just another AirPlay destination. Even better, because it’s AirPlay, Airfoil Speakers Touch allows direct iOS-to-iOS audio output, something that’s otherwise not available from Apple.


This could be a great use for an outdated iPhone or iPod touch, perhaps one with a cracked screen or bad battery. You could then plug the device into wall power, attach a pair of powered speakers via a stereo headphone jack, and use it to extend audio to wherever you like.

 

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Comments about Airfoil Speakers Touch 3 Adds AirPlay Receiver
(Comments are closed.)

Paul Schwan  2012-05-01 02:57
Thanks! I wouldn't know about so many of these little tidbits were it not for your TidBits over all these years! I'm listening to my iPhone playing Pandora thru my 3rd Gen iTouch as I write...
Adam Engst  An apple icon for a TidBITS Staffer 2012-05-01 06:23
Yes, I really like how Rogue Amoeba has made it possible to keep an old iOS device in services as an AirPlay receiver, potentially eliminating the need to buy a separate AirPort Express Base Station.