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FTP Snatching

FTP Snatching -- In response to our FAQtoid that mentioned how spammers might capture your email address when you visit a Web page, Peter N Lewis noted a sneaky technique involving FTP: Another way I've heard to snatch an email address when visiting a Web page is by coding an inline image with an FTP URL

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Myths of the Net

Myths of the Net -- Ken Lager points us to a good resource for debunking stories like the AOL 4.0 rumor we lambasted last issue: I have found that the best way to deal with mail warning me of a deadly computer virus is to fire up my Web browser and head on over to the Computer Virus Myths page at Rob Rosenberger's non-profit Web site

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Move Me

Move Me -- Martyn Wilkinson writes in regards to the graphic file formats article in NetBITS-007: There's one point Glenn forgot to mention: GIF files support multiple "frames," which means they can be used for simple animation

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Paths to POPs

Paths to POPs -- John Baxter , a colleague of ours out on the Olympic Peninsula, notes that POPs aren't the only way for providers to build networks. Similar to the UK solution we mention above, U.S

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50 Pence for the Next 10 Minutes, Please

50 Pence for the Next 10 Minutes, Please -- Mark Townshend wrote in response to Paul Durrant's letter last week in NetBITS-006 about how some UK ISPs don't maintain points of presence (POPs) all over the country, but rather forward calls to a central, vast modem pool

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Our Man in Botswana

Our Man in Botswana -- Phil Hudson writes from Gaborone, Botswana, with thoughts on who legislation on computer crime really affects: The increasingly important issue of computer crime needs to be debated with a better, clearer understanding of the main perpetrators, and that includes, unfortunately, nation-states, their governments, administrations, law enforcement agencies, and spies

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Forward My Calls

Forward My Calls -- Paul Durrant responded to the FAQtoids 005 item on how ISPs have local dialing numbers outside their main network center. He noted that Demon, a large ISP in the UK, actually works with British Telecom to have the phone call itself forwarded

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Fear of an Encrypted Planet

Fear of an Encrypted Planet -- In response to Brady Johnson's first installment on computer crime in NetBITS-005, Edward Reid responds to a point on key escrow: Key escrow arose in response to regulatory agencies' fear of being unable to decode private messages, especially encrypted telephone conversations

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Who’s There?

Who's There? Joe Bates points out an important element to the aggravation that is spam. Maybe I'm missing some essential point here. In all of the discussions of spamming, the legislative and administrative solutions available or proposed, it seems that it all comes back to one point: all email messages should have a legitimate email return address attached to them

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ISDN Purchasing Advice

ISDN Purchasing Advice -- Louis Lee offers some advice from his experience as a major ISP network engineer in purchasing ISDN equipment for companies. Try to obtain demo models of the routers for which you are shopping

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Ramping Up Cheaply

Ramping Up Cheaply -- Ole Eichorn writes about a nifty device he's found useful to give himself a virtual router without woes. I've been using a WebRamp ISDN router in my house for six months, and it is wonderful

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Omissions

Omissions -- Robert Morse notes an omission from our list of excellent Web resources for developing sites and writing scripts in NetBITS-002: Not taking umbrage, but adding a reference

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Stop Your Glottis

Stop Your Glottis -- In response to our GIF pronunciation pronouncement in FAQtoids 003, Joe Clark wrote us a stern note about phonology that makes everything much clearer. There is no such thing as a hard or soft g, no matter what your second grade teacher told you

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AOL and Innocent By-Senders

AOL and Innocent By-Senders -- AOL offers an anti-spam feature called PreferredMail that its subscribers can activate. By doing so, an AOL account can bounce all mail from a list of offenders that AOL is constantly compiling

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It’s “Jiff” and I Don’t Want to Hear Another Word

Logic may dictate the "g" in GIF (Graphic Interchange Format) is pronounced hard, like gift or gefilte fish, but that didn't stop dozens and dozens of readers from offering opinions, many of them hilarious.