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HandBrake 1.1.0

The HandBrake Team has released version 1.1.0 of its open-source video conversion program HandBrake. The update features an overhauled user interface designed for better flow and to look better on high-resolution displays. HandBrake 1.1.0 also adds new presets (for Vimeo, YouTube, and 4K video), adds new sharpening filters, and improves its Apple TV 4K support. VoiceOver navigation has been improved as well, there’s now an option to configure the low disk space warning level, and many bugs have been squashed. (Free, 16.1 MB, release notes, 10.7+)

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Comments About HandBrake 1.1.0

Notable Replies

  1. I’ve not updated to 1.1.0 yet, but am using a nightly build from a month ago. The reason I switched to that nightly build is because it encodes HEVC streams in a way that is compatible with iOS devices. Previous versions used a different style of HEVC that encodes the metadata in the bitstream, that Apple doesn’t support in the iOS built-in video player. I assume this new version of Handbrake contains this change as well, so another very worthwhile reason to upgrade!

  2. I like the new UI, it’s a lot cleaner and easier to navigate. It may be my imagination, but I ran a 1080p30 Super fast and it seemed the number of frames per second was higher than on the pervious version.

  3. Hmm. I’ve run it twice now over a 20GB video (it’s a 4h30m super cut fan-edit of the Hobbit trilogy, once for a mp4 1080p and once for an mkv, both times I ended up with a file of only a few hundred MB. Not sure what is wrong, but the presets are definitely not working properly.

  4. This doesn’t help your issue, but you could encode once to an mp4 and then use ffmpeg on the command line to copy the contents to an mkv (or vice versa), which will save a lot of tine. The two formats are just different containers, but the video and audio streams contained in them are the same (or can be).

  5. If encoding to an mp5 worked sure, but both the mp4 and the mkv attempts from HB 1.1 came out at a fe hundred MB from a 20GB source file of a four-and-a-half hour 1080p movie.

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