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Security Update 2018-003 (High Sierra) and Security Update 2018-006 (Sierra)

Apple has released Security Update 2018-003 for macOS 10.13 High Sierra and Security Update 2017-006 for macOS 10.12 Sierra, patching a number of security vulnerabilities. Both updates address a validation issue that could allow an application to be able to read restricted memory, memory corruption issues that could allow an application to execute arbitrary code with kernel privileges, and a logic issue that could allow a malicious application to elevate privileges. (Free. For 10.13.6 High Sierra, 1.82 GB; for 10.12.6 Sierra, 828.4 MB; security content release notes)

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Comments About Security Update 2018-003 (High Sierra) and Security Update 2018-006 (Sierra)

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  1. I often set up an ad-hoc (computer-to-computer) wireless network to synchronize files from my laptop to my office computer. I’ve noticed, since this security update was applied yesterday to both machines (running macOS 10.13.6), that neither of them can recognize an ad-hoc network. Both can create one, that is, but neither can see a network created by the other. The reason why I think it’s something about this update, beyond when the problem started, is that I can easily see and join the networks created by either computer from my iPad (running iOS 12.1.1) just as I did before the security update.

    Has anyone else (on High Sierra or eve on Mojave) encountered something similar? If so, has anyone determined what might be causing the issue?

  2. That’s freaky specific, but could easily be an issue. Hopefully someone else here will be able to test—I don’t have the right machines to test this easily.

  3. Since installing this security upgrade, I have had problems on a couple of occasion of losing my internet connection and had to do a restart to solve the problem.

    Also I notice that Apple still hasn’t fixed Safari causing problems with Quick Look. You would think that after all the many complaints that Apple would fix the issue - can’t be hard.

  4. I told AppStore to install this. When I restarted, there was the usual login display of accounts. I selected one and entered my password. The progress bar paused halfway across for some seconds, then the the screen did something too fact to see and progress continued. Then a full screen log was displayed, with the notice that the installation had failed and several choices. I chose restart, same thing. I used the power button to shut down, same thing. I was able to work by starting with Option down and selecting the my system drive. This continued for a couple of days. Then yesterday the machine started from the system drive.

    AppStore is showing this update under Update Available. I get notifications that there is an update, offering to restart.

  5. I had the exact same baloney happen to me on an old 2010 15" MBP.

    The solution for me was to restart in safe mode (boot holding shift). That allowed me to log in without the log file display. I then launched MAS and saw that the update was still listed as available (i.e. it had not been properly installed), so I just selected to have it install again. After that it rebooted and resumed normal behavior. The update disappeared from MAS so obviously the second time around it installed ok.

    I’m surprised that Apple a) doesn’t test these updates sufficiently before putting them into the wild and b) thinks that displaying a whole bunch of log files with no indication of what went wrong and zero instructions for the user on what they should do is in any way a good idea. It’s just Apple being sloppy. And it sucks. Hope you get your issue fixed. :crossed_fingers:

  6. I’ve had the same problems with my late 2013 iMac under High Sierra and the Mac Pro mid 2010. Apple quality check failed in my opinion.

  7. I’d like to try Simon’s technique, but I don’t know (and can’t find out) what MAS is. (If that technique does not work, I’ll try Al’s.

    By the way, after three tries, Apple software gave up trying to install and failing to the log. Now I boot normally. Meanwhile, AppStore keeps reminding me to restart to install the update. And About This Mac shows 10.13.6.

  8. It’s an abbreviation for Mac App Store.

  9. Sorry about that. I’m too lazy. @ddmiller is right.

    Just open the Mac App Store once you’re able to log on after safe boot and check if it’s still showing you the update. If it is, that’s a sign the update wasn’t properly applied. So just have it install it again. In case you don’t see it listed in the App Store’s update section try cmd-r (refresh)

  10. Please don’t overlook the notation here to Restart in Safe Mode: immediately hold the Shift key down upon hearing the Startup Chime (or before gray screen on newest Macs lacking the chime); keep holding until your Desktop becomes fully visible — or you reach the login screen, if enabled (where ‘Safe Mode’ will appear in red in the upper right Menubar).

    If login screen is enabled, there is conflicting evidence that suggests you should again depress the Shift key instantly after entering your password until your Desktop and Dock appear to have fully loaded. It won’t hurt.

    You can confirm you are in Safe Mode under Software in System Information (from About This Mac).

  11. Thanks, folks. The reinstallation in Safe Mode worked. There was some strange behavior; I restarted and all is well.

    Oops. I mean: all seems to be well; time will tell.

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