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Extract Directly from Time Machine

Normally you use Time Machine to restore lost data in a file like this: within the Time Machine interface, you go back to the time the file was not yet messed up, and you restore it to replace the file you have now.

You can also elect to keep both, but the restored file takes the name and place of the current one. So, if you have made changes since the backup took place that you would like to keep, they are lost, or you have to mess around a bit to merge changes, rename files, and trash the unwanted one.

As an alternative, you can browse the Time Machine backup volume directly in the Finder like any normal disk, navigate through the chronological backup hierarchy, and find the file which contains the lost content.

Once you've found it, you can open it and the current version of the file side-by-side, and copy information from Time Machine's version of the file into the current one, without losing any content you put in it since the backup was made.

Submitted by
Eolake Stobblehouse

 

 

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More Word Macro Viruses

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More Word Macro Viruses -- According to a recent CIAC bulletin, new Microsoft Word macro viruses have been discovered, and at least two of the new varieties are damaging. (See TidBITS-312 for a related story.)

http://ciac.llnl.gov/ciac/bulletins/g-10a.shtml

Although the worst effects are still reserved for Windows users (apparently the virus engineers aren't up-to-date on cross-platform concerns), users of Microsoft Word 6.0 or 6.0.1 on the Macintosh should be concerned. Microsoft has released new tools to combat these viruses, and many commercial anti-virus products are being updated to detect them as well.

http://www.microsoft.com/msoffice/freestuf/ msword/download/mvtool/mvtool2.htm

I haven't examined or tested Microsoft's new virus protection tools, and though Microsoft claims these tools work on a Macintosh, they're posted in a self-extracting ZIP format for DOS/Windows machines. StuffIt Expander with Expander Enhancer will decompress the file; so will Thomas Brown's popular Mac shareware utility ZipIt. As with Microsoft's earlier anti-virus tool, Microsoft's new utility only scans files opened by choosing Open from the File menu; documents which are double-clicked in the Finder or chosen from the recent documents list are not scanned. [GD]

Microsoft -- 206/635-7200 -- <wordinfo@microsoft.com>

ftp://mirror.aol.com/pub/info-mac/cmp/stuffit- expander-352.bin
ftp://mirror.aol.com/pub/info-mac/cmp/drop- stuff-with-ee-352.hqx
ftp://mirror.aol.com/pub/info-mac/cmp/zip-it- 135.hqx

 

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