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Avoid Naming Pear Note Files

If you create a lot of documents, coming up with a name for them can sometimes be a hassle. This is especially true now that search is becoming a more prevalent way to find documents. Pear Note provides a way to have the application automatically generate a filename so you can avoid this hassle. To use this:

  1. Open Saving under Pear Note's preferences.
  2. Select a default save location.
  3. Select a default save name template (Pear Note's help documents all the fields that can be automatically filled in).
  4. Check the box stating that Command-S saves without prompting.
  5. If you decide you want to name a particular note later, just use Save As... instead.

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Few Jobs for North Carolinians in the iCloud

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According to this Washington Post article, Apple’s massive new data center in North Carolina created only 50 jobs associated with running the facility, and Google and Facebook data centers in the state have also failed to dent the unemployment rate due to a lack of technical skills among local residents. Construction-related jobs are created, but they’re temporary. That’s not to say the data centers won’t help the local economies some, but not as much as it might seem, especially in light of the massive tax breaks used as lures.favicon follow link

 

Comments about Few Jobs for North Carolinians in the iCloud
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Adam Engst  An apple icon for a TidBITS Staffer 2011-11-29 16:43
Our friend Chuck Goolsbee, who's a data center expert, argues that there's nothing really new here - that low-skill jobs are always being lost as technology makes them obsolete, and that any economic benefits these data centers provide are better than nothing.

http://chuck.goolsbee.org/archives/3854

He's absolutely right, of course, but it's important that the large technology firms creating massive data centers in economically impoverished areas be seen neither as saviors or villains. As usual, the truth lies somewhere in between.