Thoughtful, detailed coverage of the Mac, iPhone, and iPad, plus the best-selling Take Control ebooks.

 

 

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Opening a Folder from the Dock

Sick of the dock on Mac OS X Leopard not being able to open folders with a simple click, like sanity demands and like it used to be in Tiger? You can, of course click it, and then click again on Open in Finder, but that's twice as many clicks as it used to be. (And while you're at it, Control-click the folder, and choose both Display as Folder and View Content as List from the contextual menu. Once you have the content displaying as a list, there's an Open command right there, but that requires Control-clicking and choosing a menu item.) The closest you can get to opening a docked folder with a single click is Command-click, which opens its enclosing folder. However, if you instead put a file from the docked folder in the Dock, and Command-click that file, you'll see the folder you want. Of course, if you forget to press Command when clicking, you'll open the file, which may be even more annoying.

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Bruce Tognazzini Discusses Browse vs. Search in iOS

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The venerable interface designer Bruce Tognazzini devotes his latest “Ask Tog” column to the question of whether it’s better to browse or search lists in iOS, such as in the Contacts app. It’s a fascinating read, not so much for his proposed redesign, but for the background of why aspects of iOS can be so frustrating for some people.favicon follow link

 

Comments about Bruce Tognazzini Discusses Browse vs. Search in iOS
(Comments are closed.)

barefootguru  2011-12-05 16:46
I'm happy to use search when it takes me to a place, such as in text documents, books, programs, etc.; but reluctant to when the displayed items are reduced, such as Address Book, iTunes, and Mail.

It's not because I can't handle different spellings like Bruce suggests.

I think my reluctance is a combination of the search (temporarily) destroying my spatial list, and having something to 'clean up' afterwards.