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Record Online Meetings in Pear Note

While Pear Note is primarily geared toward recording notes in the physical world, it's possible to use it to record things in the virtual world as well. For instance, you can use it to record and take notes on Skype calls. To do this:

  1. Download Soundflower and install it (along with the Soundflowerbed app that comes with it).
  2. Download LineIn and install it.
  3. Start Soundflowerbed, and select Built-in Output (or whatever output you'd like to listen to the conversation on).
  4. Start LineIn, and select your microphone (e.g. Built-in Mic) as the input and Soundflower (2ch) as the output, then press Pass Thru.
  5. Open Pear Note Preferences, select Recording, and select Soundflower (2ch) as the audio device.
  6. Open Skype Preferences, select Audio, and select Soundflower (2ch) as the audio output and your microphone (e.g. Built-in Mic) as the audio input.
  7. Hit record in Pear Note and make your Skype call.

This will allow you to conduct your Skype call while Pear Note records both your audio and the other participant's.

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CES Press Day Shows You’re Not Missing Much

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From CNET’s coverage, the Consumer Electronics Show press day sounds uninspired. The PC world is getting into ultrabooks (think of a MacBook Air running Windows), there are new TVs that don’t look all that different from old TVs, smartphone manufacturers are trying out large-screen models that won’t fit in a pocket, 3-D printers are still kind of expensive, and cameras will increasingly have Wi-Fi. Oh, and Microsoft will no longer exhibit at CES.favicon follow link

 

Comments about CES Press Day Shows You’re Not Missing Much
(Comments are closed.)

Jill Kennedy  2012-01-10 13:36
I think CES is pretty worthless these days. If it was held in Akron or Fresno I don't think many people would attend. It's really all about Vegas and the executives pretending it's important so that they can use their expense accounts in Vegas. I think it's funny that there are all these pre-CES stories about all the excitement and then after a couple of days in Vegas the stories stop flowing - my hunch is because everyone who is working on covering the show is hungover and unable to write effectively.
Jeff Carlson  An apple icon for a TidBITS Staffer 2012-01-10 13:17
I went to CES one year, and I can tell you that from this reporter's perspective, the drop-off in stories is due to two factors:

1. Exhaustion. CES is huge and really a bombardment of the senses. At one point at the end of my second day, my legs could almost literally no longer keep me upright, and I had to sit down against a wall to recover. I should have brought a pedometer, because I'm sure I walked miles and miles.

2. Repetition: All the big, exciting products get reported on at first, and then it's a hunt to find something interesting. And in so many cases, much of the rest of the show is either also-ran products (oh look, more TVs) or junk.

It's also important to remember that the people attending aren't consumers. Most of them are resellers getting hands-on experience with products to see what they plan to stock and sell in the coming year. It's a media event because people are interested in what's coming down the pike, but that's it.

I'm sure there's a lot of drinking and gambling and burning of expense accounts, but I didn't experience any of that. I blew some cash in a Star Wars slot machine one night. Whoop! Whoop!