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Extract Directly from Time Machine

Normally you use Time Machine to restore lost data in a file like this: within the Time Machine interface, you go back to the time the file was not yet messed up, and you restore it to replace the file you have now.

You can also elect to keep both, but the restored file takes the name and place of the current one. So, if you have made changes since the backup took place that you would like to keep, they are lost, or you have to mess around a bit to merge changes, rename files, and trash the unwanted one.

As an alternative, you can browse the Time Machine backup volume directly in the Finder like any normal disk, navigate through the chronological backup hierarchy, and find the file which contains the lost content.

Once you've found it, you can open it and the current version of the file side-by-side, and copy information from Time Machine's version of the file into the current one, without losing any content you put in it since the backup was made.

Submitted by
Eolake Stobblehouse

 
 

Cook Promises New Professional Mac for 2013

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In response to a customer's query about the underwhelming Mac Pro update released this week (see "Mac Pro Gains Only Minor Speed Bump, Not Thunderbolt or USB 3.0," 11 June 2012), Apple CEO Tim Cook replied by email that Apple is indeed working on a more substantial update to the professional tower Mac. Cook writes, "Although we didn’t have a chance to talk about a new Mac Pro at today’s event, don’t worry as we’re working on something really great for later next year." Macworld confirmed with Apple that the message was indeed from Cook.favicon follow link