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Is it a Unicode Font?

To determine if your font is Unicode-compliant, with all its characters coded and mapped correctly, choose the Font in any program (or in Font Book, set the preview area to Custom (Preview > Custom), and type Option-Shift-2.

If you get a euro character (a sort of uppercase C with two horizontal lines through its midsection), it's 99.9 percent certain the font is Unicode-compliant. If you get a graphic character that's gray rounded-rectangle frame with a euro character inside it, the font is definitely not Unicode-compliant. (The fact that the image has a euro sign in it is only coincidental: it's the image used for any missing currency sign.)

This assumes that you're using U.S. input keyboard, which is a little ironic when the euro symbol is the test. With the British keyboard, for instance, Option-2 produces the euro symbol if it's part of the font.

Visit Take Control of Fonts in Leopard

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Sharon Zardetto

 

 

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Walt Mossberg’s Last Wall Street Journal Article

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After 22 years, Walt Mossberg is leaving The Wall Street Journal, along with his partner Kara Swisher, for a new media venture, Re/code. To wrap up his two-decade stint at the Journal, Walt rounded up twelve of the most influential tech products in that time. Many were made by Apple, but a few might surprise you.favicon follow link

 

Comments about Walt Mossberg’s Last Wall Street Journal Article

Lee Baker  2013-12-25 00:42
A lot of intrigue, as well as twists and turns there, when I did a more in-depth 'net search to find why Walt *really* parted ways with Dow Jones and the WSJ.

Google tentacles are everywhere. ;-)