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Extract Directly from Time Machine

Normally you use Time Machine to restore lost data in a file like this: within the Time Machine interface, you go back to the time the file was not yet messed up, and you restore it to replace the file you have now.

You can also elect to keep both, but the restored file takes the name and place of the current one. So, if you have made changes since the backup took place that you would like to keep, they are lost, or you have to mess around a bit to merge changes, rename files, and trash the unwanted one.

As an alternative, you can browse the Time Machine backup volume directly in the Finder like any normal disk, navigate through the chronological backup hierarchy, and find the file which contains the lost content.

Once you've found it, you can open it and the current version of the file side-by-side, and copy information from Time Machine's version of the file into the current one, without losing any content you put in it since the backup was made.

Submitted by
Eolake Stobblehouse

 
 

Aldus ChartMaker

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Aldus ChartMaker may not print, but that doesn't make it an applet. Jason Stephenson <jjstep00@ukcc.uky.edu> wrote in response to the TidBITS-230 mention of ChartMaker: "How can anyone call a program that requires 8 MB of hard disk space and wants 4 MB of RAM an 'applet?' Everyone complains about Word's disk requirements but it is less bloated than this thing from Aldus. ChartMaker may provide plenty of functionality in making charts but is not what I consider an applet."

I had assumed that the full 8 MB disk requirement included a small application and various extras (online help, templates, fonts, clip art, and so on). Word requires more hard disk space to install than it actually takes up, and I had assumed that ChartMaker installs similarly. I called Aldus to find out if ChartMaker consumes 8 MB of disk space for the typical user, and found that if you tweak it a bit you can knock it down to 5 MB. I also found that unless you have an installation problem, you must pay $2 per minute for ChartMaker support. Ouch. Overall, I'm not impressed. If we are going to have small, integrated applications, they'd better start out smaller than ChartMaker, and such a goal isn't unrealistic. [TJE]

 

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