Thoughtful, detailed coverage of the Mac, iPhone, and iPad, plus the best-selling Take Control ebooks.

 

 

Pick an apple! 
 
Springy Dock Tricks

If you drag a file and hover over Dock icons, various useful things happen which are similar to Finder springing. If it's a window, the window un-minimizes from the Dock. If it's a stack, the corresponding folder in the Finder opens. If it's the Finder, it brings the Finder to the foreground and opens a window if one doesn't exist already. But the coolest (and most hidden) springing trick is if you hover over an application and press the Space bar, the application comes to the foreground. This is great for things like grabbing a file from somewhere to drop into a Mail composition window that's otherwise hidden. Grab the file you want, hover over the Mail icon, press the Space bar, and Mail comes to the front for you to drop the file into the compose window. Be sure that Spring-Loaded Folders and Windows is enabled in the Finder Preferences window.

Visit plucky tree

Submitted by
cricket

 
 

Reversing Your View

Send Article to a Friend

Recently in TidBITS, we've examined a few factors that contribute to poor readability on computer monitors (see Better Typography Coming to a Screen Near You in TidBITS 403, and the followup Web Reading Requires More than Just Character(s) in TidBITS 405). In the followup, we noted the Mac's "paper" approach of displaying black text on a white background can be difficult on the eyes, and several respondents pointed out Apple's CloseView control panel can, in fact, reverse your screen's display (and zoom in as far as 16x for those with vision difficulties). Although it's no longer part of the standard Mac OS installation, it's available online from Apple's Disability Connection (along with Easy Access and MouseKeys for PowerBook) and in Mac OS 8's custom installation options. Please note there are several known issues with CloseView: it's incompatible with some mainstream applications and QuickDraw GX, plus it can have problems in low memory situations, on multiple monitor configurations, and on monitors displaying more than 256 colors. However, for many folks, it's exactly the (free!) solution they need.

 

READERS LIKE YOU! Support TidBITS by becoming a member today!
Check out the perks at <http://tidbits.com/member_benefits.html>
Special thanks to Frank Hartzell, Jim Londrey, Ron Yantzi, and Scott
Lasley for their generous support!