Thoughtful, detailed coverage of the Mac, iPhone, and iPad, plus the best-selling Take Control ebooks.

 

 

Pick an apple! 
 
Is it a Unicode Font?

To determine if your font is Unicode-compliant, with all its characters coded and mapped correctly, choose the Font in any program (or in Font Book, set the preview area to Custom (Preview > Custom), and type Option-Shift-2.

If you get a euro character (a sort of uppercase C with two horizontal lines through its midsection), it's 99.9 percent certain the font is Unicode-compliant. If you get a graphic character that's gray rounded-rectangle frame with a euro character inside it, the font is definitely not Unicode-compliant. (The fact that the image has a euro sign in it is only coincidental: it's the image used for any missing currency sign.)

This assumes that you're using U.S. input keyboard, which is a little ironic when the euro symbol is the test. With the British keyboard, for instance, Option-2 produces the euro symbol if it's part of the font.

Visit Take Control of Fonts in Leopard

Submitted by
Sharon Zardetto

 
 

JavaScript Yourself Anonymous

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JavaScript Yourself Anonymous -- In response to letters on hiding your email address on a Web page to avoid spammers sucking it down, Joseph McLean <flux@thecentre.com> wrote us with a nifty JavaScript-based solution, which he offers for free:

Brandon Munday mentioned how he removed all "clickable" mailto links from his Web site to thwart the evil address-collecting spiders. Making a site non-clickable is so counter to the Web's nature that I became convinced there had to be another way. And there is - if you turn to JavaScript for aid.
JavaScript is not ubiquitous technology, but this can also work in your favor, because spiders don't speak that language - and most of your human visitors have browsers that do. Here's an example I cooked up in five minutes.

<script language=javascript>
<!--
// SpamProof Mail Script 1.0
// by Joseph McLean <flux@thecentre.com> - freeware
// Linktext is the text you want folks to see and click upon.
// email1 & email2 are the text on either side of your
// email address's @ sign.

var linktext = "Email Me!"
var email1 = "jsmith"
var email2 = "where-ever.com"

document.write("<a href=" + "mail" + "to:" + email1 + "@" + email2 + ">" + linktext + "</a>")

//-->
</script>

This chunk of code can be pasted into your Web page's HTML at any point. Some old browsers don't support JavaScript, but they won't hit an error - the mail link will simply be invisible (as it is to spiders).

 

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