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Extract Directly from Time Machine

Normally you use Time Machine to restore lost data in a file like this: within the Time Machine interface, you go back to the time the file was not yet messed up, and you restore it to replace the file you have now.

You can also elect to keep both, but the restored file takes the name and place of the current one. So, if you have made changes since the backup took place that you would like to keep, they are lost, or you have to mess around a bit to merge changes, rename files, and trash the unwanted one.

As an alternative, you can browse the Time Machine backup volume directly in the Finder like any normal disk, navigate through the chronological backup hierarchy, and find the file which contains the lost content.

Once you've found it, you can open it and the current version of the file side-by-side, and copy information from Time Machine's version of the file into the current one, without losing any content you put in it since the backup was made.

Submitted by
Eolake Stobblehouse

 

 

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Symantec Ships Norton Utilities 4.0

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After a lengthy period of public beta testing, Symantec Corporation has released Norton Utilities for Macintosh 4.0, featuring support for both Mac OS 8.5 and the HFS+ disk format introduced more than six months ago with Mac OS 8.1. (See "All About Macintosh Extended Format (HFS Plus)" in TidBITS 414.) Along with a revised user interface, Norton Utilites components are now PowerPC-native for improved performance, and Norton Unerase can attempt to recover entire folders as well as individual files. Of course, Norton Utilities still features the widely used Disk Doctor and Speed Disk utilities for disk repair and optimization, and a bootable data recovery CD-ROM. Norton Utilities for Macintosh 4.0 should be priced around $100, and requires System 7.5.5 or greater and a 68040 or PowerPC-based Macintosh with 16 MB of RAM. Symantec says owners of previous versions will be able to upgrade for $50.

 

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