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Extract Directly from Time Machine

Normally you use Time Machine to restore lost data in a file like this: within the Time Machine interface, you go back to the time the file was not yet messed up, and you restore it to replace the file you have now.

You can also elect to keep both, but the restored file takes the name and place of the current one. So, if you have made changes since the backup took place that you would like to keep, they are lost, or you have to mess around a bit to merge changes, rename files, and trash the unwanted one.

As an alternative, you can browse the Time Machine backup volume directly in the Finder like any normal disk, navigate through the chronological backup hierarchy, and find the file which contains the lost content.

Once you've found it, you can open it and the current version of the file side-by-side, and copy information from Time Machine's version of the file into the current one, without losing any content you put in it since the backup was made.

Submitted by
Eolake Stobblehouse

 

 

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Apple Announces Darwin Open Source Project

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Apple Announces Darwin Open Source Project -- Last week, Apple announced it plans to make the source code for the foundation layers of Mac OS X Server available via an open source initiative called Darwin. Developers who agree with the Apple Public Source License can register with Apple to gain access to the source code, which will include Apple's enhancements to the Mach 2.5 microkernel in Mac OS X Server, plus several Apple technologies such as AppleTalk, the HFS Plus file system, and the new NetInfo distributed database. Apple says it plans to include additional software in its open source offerings, but don't expect to see source code for Apple's bread-and-butter technologies (like the current Mac OS, QuickTime, WebObjects, or the NeXT application layer) released as open source. Source code for Darwin should be available to developers in early April. It remains to be seen whether Darwin will be genuinely useful to developers, or whether Apple is merely surfing the open source wave. See TidBITS Talk for debate on the topic. [GD]

<http://www.opensource.org/>
<http://www.apple.com/darwin/>
<http://www.publicsource.apple.com/apsl.html>
<http://db.tidbits.com/getbits.acgi?tlkthrd=629>

 

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